Sunday, March 24, 2013

Trading In One Dream For Another

We didn't get into language immersion. Specifically, we didn't get KIP at Claire Lilienthal, the program I'd been preparing for since before my child was out of newborn diapers.

I hired a bilingual nanny when I went back to work.  Only TV shows and movies in Korean were allowed in our home. We read a book in Korean every night. I chose a language immersion daycare and stayed there, opting out of preschool, with the goal of passing the SFUSD language proficiency test.  It worked. My child passed the SFUSD proficiency test with flying colors, scoring in the advanced proficient range.

And we didn't get in.

This year, an unprecedented number of kindergarten applicants took the Korean proficiency test.  I heard that over 50 children took the test, many of them native speakers. So we didn't get a spot, which is as it should be. I agree that when there are more language-proficient applicants than spots, the spots should go to the native speakers the program was designed for.

Meanwhile, I was touring private schools as "backup" and seeing the kind of education that $25k buys you.  My experience is a lesson in not going by tour impressions. When I toured Friends, I was turned off by how few Asian children I saw compared to the public schools. A parent told an anecdote about kindergarteners learning responsibility by bringing their milk cups to the playground, and I thought of the epic battles that have raged in our home trying to get my Asian child to drink milk. Then the admissions director talked about not having grades and not releasing students' ERB scores to parents, and I thought "You're going to deny me cold, hard data on my child?"

I left not planning to apply. Then I thought, I can't write off this school; it's the one that on paper reflects my values the most. Learning more about the Friends Community Scholars, after first hearing about it in a K-Files review of Friends (thanks, 1+1+1!) reinforced this.  So I went through the process, and surprisingly, Friends turned into one of my top choices. A great parent interview alleviated my concerns around the number of Asian students and diversity overall and confirmed that this was the place that shared my values, but the clincher was the kindergarten playdate.

After most kindergarten playdates, I'd heard, "That was not fun."  At this one, I watched my child come in from the playground with the other kids, unself-consciously skipping in line. Even from 10 yards away, I could see how happy my child was. Afterward, I heard, "I liked that place," "I liked the boy teacher," and "I built a big rocket there. If I go back, I'm going to build an even bigger one!"

Academically, Friends seemed to balance not being bored and being overly stressed, hitting the sweet spot where learning would stay fun, and my child stay motivated to learn. I wanted my child to be challenged, but not to be overly stressed about grades or burn out in middle school. At another school, a parent had hired a tutor for their child in kindergarten before any problems showed up, and advised prospective parents to do the same. The admissions director there had a tutor for their own child.  I didn't want that kind of pressure for my child.

Socially, I hoped that being with a group of families who bought into Quaker values might temper any envy of the "lifestyles of the rich and famous" and reduce social stratification by income. The school professed a commitment to including a broader socioeconomic segment. Since budgets reflect organizational priorities, I checked out the financial data in the IRS Form 990s for Friends and several other schools to confirm this.

I thought about my experience coming from an unknown daycare and applying for private kindergartens.  I didn't know what schools were most prestigious or coveted. I didn't have a preschool director calling schools, nor a session to explain the application process, how to prepare your child, what to emphasize or what not to say at the parent interview. My child never knew any of the other children at the kindergarten playdates. How much harder would it be to do it blindly for high school?  There's no SFHighSchoolFiles; I don't even know what the private high schools are.

All this to say, even before the SFUSD letter arrived, I was thinking that Friends would be a better match for my child than KIP.  Still, the teacher at our language immersion program brought tears to my eyes the next morning as she expressed her disappointment.  I didn't understand a lot of the words, but the gist was clear: "After speaking so well and doing so well on the test, they didn't get in, what a shame."

In an ideal world, I'd like my child to go to KIP for K-3 while I save up for a few years, then to Friends starting in 4th or 5th grade. That would be the best blend of language, culture, academics and finances. But that's not one of my choices. If I turn this down now, I don't know if we'll get in again later on. Plus, I'm aware of how difficult it is to break into the social scene after the first few years, especially if you're not one of the rich kids.

So we are trading in one dream for another, and heading to Friends. Thinking of giving up KIP still sometimes brings tears to my eyes, but in the end, I feel very, very fortunate in this crazy search for a kindergarten that we San Francisco parents go through, with its unexpected happy endings.

An 2015 update is here.

67 comments:

  1. We'll see you there! Our first choice shifted as well as things progressed, and it was quite surprised by our change of heart. And thrilled at the opportunity.

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  2. Good for you! We were also offered a spot at friends and it was a supper hard decision to turn them down but at the end we went with a public chool. The tuition is $26k now and most likely will increase by $1k each year. I didn't want to be pressured in by thinking that we won a lottery and the lifestyle change for 2 kids would just have been too great. I am happy with our decision but burnt out by the whole process and wish I would have been able to be excited either way.

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    1. Which public did you turn Friends down for?

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    2. The school (sffs) has embarked on a large capital campaign so factor in much more than tuition fees in coming years ...

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  3. Congrats SFGeekmom, I've enjoyed reading your reviews the most and your perspective and am genuinely sorry that you didn't get into KIP at Lilienthal. I would suggest trying again in Grade 1 (or subsequent rounds), if you keep up the Korean language instruction at home. We toured Friends and thought it a very sweet school indeed and really stressed about whether to take an offer this week as we loved the values and the lower school especially, but weren't as impressed with the upper school academics. They shared some ways they are trying to fix academics and have hired lots of new resources, but I know anecdotally of 2 separate families with very intelligent boys who chose to transfer out of middle school as it wasn't academically rigorous, and based on reading your reviews carefully, this seems to be something you may also value. Perhaps it will turn around by the time your child gets to be middle school age, but my advice is to watch closely and know you don't have to stay at a school for 9 years. Finally, I agree, who cares if a private school is "top 5" or not; initially, what matters is a strong social-emotional experience, and Friends is very good at that element I believe. Best of luck!

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  4. Don't cry SFGeekmom, you may not have to give up the dream yet! I know one family that is giving up their spot at Lilienthal to go private, and there is a possibility that you may still get in later rounds or next year. If not, as you say, things have a way of working out and it's great you have a strong private back up option. Best of luck to you!

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  5. Welcome to Friends! Given your previous reviews, this is a very surprising choice. We are a Friends family, and the school's approach in our expereience has been the opposite of data driven! Not only are there no grades and very light homework (which we love!), they also ask families to assure that they do not read, discuss or look at their child's homework and it is never graded or corrected. It's the opposite of a traditional school in our experience (again, which we love). There are absolutely no grades just subjective impressions on portfolios of work. Our experience has been lovely, but many of the families we know have really struggled with this. I applaud you for bravely embracing something quite different to your initial approach to finding a school.

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    1. "they also ask families to assure that they do not read, discuss or look at their child's homework "

      How cult-like and controlling! Creepy.

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    2. Seriously??? Cult like? Give me a break. So they don't want parents doing their kids homework for them. So creepy and cult like. Sounds like sour grapes to me.

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    3. Yes, please don't even apply to our "cult-like" school! Stay away!

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    4. I don't have a child at Friends and am in no way affiliated with the school, but I LOVE that homework is meant for the child, not the parent. What a way to teach real responsibility, while also ensuring family time is really family time.

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    5. As a Friends family, it's really not a big deal. It's only been an issue if your child is struggling with a particular subject and asks for help and you have to explain that you can't, but that happens infrequently and more if your child has a learning issue.

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    6. I really don't get this approach. What is wrong with grades and why give homeowrk if it won't be checked and corrected? How do you learn from that? Is not knowing the right answer or how to correctly solve a problem or structure an essay ok? What exactly is the benefit of that approach? And why are you more comfortable with that? Just curious. Hate to admit it but I like the measure of good grades. Where is the striving? I guess I just consider those metrics part of taking responsiblity and ownership of one's academic progress and learning, and I believe in a bit of competition among peers.I'll have check out the school next year to satisfy my curiousity.

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  6. It's a pretty sad indictment on the SFUSD lottery that 3/4 of this year's kfiles bloggers (a blog that has always tilted towards public) have ended up at private schools - Wordofmutha (Hamlin), 1+1 (Marin Prep), SFGeek (Friends). Only Muppet, who barely blogged at all, is going public with CTIP tiebreaker to Clarendon Gen. Is public school broken in this city. Did no bloggers have any viable options other than going private (other than Muppet)? I'm applying next year and have been reading this year blog very closely as research and I'm very discouraged!

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    1. It's just random variation. You can't read much into such a small sample, of 6 bloggers, not 4. Looks like Lazy Tiger Mom is going public also, and we don't know about Sunrise Sunset. Wordofthemutha and I both got substantial financial aid, and 1+1 is going for round 2.

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    2. We plan on seeing the public school through to everything short of the ten day count. We are committed to doing everything we can to make publics work.

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    3. Best of luck 1+1!!!

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    4. The system is broken in that the allocation of resources for education is out of balance so private schools, especially if you are accepted on financial aid, have a distinct draw and advantage over public schools. We have all tacitly agreed that is fine to educate one set child children on a SFUSD budget of $6500 in a system that is under constant strain and upheaval while we educate another set of children with a per capita budget of $25,000 or more. If the resource gap between the two systems was not so extreme, then we wouldn't see so many families (one third of SF families go private?) and a some of our posters go private. Even SFGeekMom says her ideal world would be KIP for a few years and then Friends. I think if there is more of a consistent financial commitment to the education of all children, both in public and private schools, then the private system would not absorb so many families and their resources (financial, personal, values) out of the public system. At this point, you can see the loss to the public system as they will not have the input and mind share of SFGeekMom and WordoftheMutha who seem like great parents. And in the end SFUSD might also not get the valuable input of 1+1.

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    5. Until we can ensure that SFUSD public school children get at least half the amount spent on their education as those in the private system, the system will be broken. We should all work to create more financial equity in our education system as it is the basis of our democracy. I can imagine that the dedicate staff and teachers within SFUSD could do a lot with $12,500 per child. Let's ask our school board members to generate more revenue for our school system to ensure that all children receive an education that enables them to be productive, active, and happy citizens.

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    6. Where are you getting the $25,000 per capita budget for private school? Do you mean tuition? I wouldn't say all that money is going toward your child. It's going toward teacher salaries and other expenses, in addition to classroom activities. From my experience, private schools usually tell you that that their tuition is not enough to cover the "true cost" of educating your child and do a lot more fundraising to make up for the difference. And you have to pay extra for field trips, music lessons, tutoring, and other things that are often free at public schools (save for a bake sale or other small fundraiser now and then). It is not a direct comparison.

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    7. $25,000 is not enough to cover the true cost of educating your child! How does SFUSD do it on $6K or whatever they get. They pay teachers, their benefits, for facilities and their upkeep, library stock, supplies all on that amount. Or do I have that wrong? SFGeekMom, do you know what the average yearly amount is spent per child in SFUSD and where that money goes? Is there a big difference on the amount of money spent on children in private v. public?

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    8. "Is there a big difference on the amount of money spent on children in private v. public?"

      There is, but not as much as the nominal figures indicate. IIRC, SFUSD was spending $8-9K per pupil, the parochials somewhat lower.

      However, there are a lot of costs the independent privates get hit with that don't apply to SFUSD or the parochials, e.g. the independent privates usually don't have fully depreciated buildings (unlike SFUSD and the parochials) and . Also, the independents pay their principals much higher (like 2-3x higher) than do the other sectors. The independent privates have to pay for overhead functions (e.g. HR) that would be at the district or archdiocese level. Independents drop a lot of money into marketing (all those slick brochures and smiling twentysomethings at their booths) which aren't incurred by the district schools. Also, the independents don't have the bargaining power of the district or archdiocese for e.g. textbooks, supplies or insurance. For health insurance for the teachers, that's a big difference in cost.

      So don't assume 'cos there's a 3-4x difference in per-pupil spend that there's 3-4x difference in what's being spent directly on your kid.

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  7. Don't get discouraged. There are ton of excellent elementary public schools. I think a lot people realize that they will be getting more extra stuff at private and when they get in, it's hard to say no to that. And most people do apply to both as backup because they are essentially two lotteries. But for the k-5, there are a lot of good public schools.

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  8. Sfgeekmom, which public school did you get In the lottery?

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  9. Other than CAIS and Presidio Knolls, what other privates did you apply to other than friends? Did you get into any other privates other than Friends?

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  10. You can still try for Korean immersion in round 2 and 3. If you don't get it, Friends with tuition assistance is a good back up. You owe it to yourself to try so that all that Korean language education early on won't be for nothing.

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  11. Friends won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it is ours. All you judgy haters stay away from our sweet little utopian school: no grades, little homework, and no silly American holidays celebrated (halloween, valentines, christmas), we love it!!!

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    1. why are no holidays celebrated at this school???

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    2. it's against the quaker testimony of being "authentic" to recognize holidays that some members of the community do not celebrate. so the staff and head decided a few days back it would be more authentic to simply not recognize any holidays (rather than pick and choose). it is a bit weird from the outside and takes some adjusting to, but you have to understand the school to get that's it's very minimal in many ways.

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    3. also, meant to add that no one will be left out if they don't get a valentine card! it saves hurt feelings!

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  12. and quaker testimonies are very real and profound. you can google them and see how life altering they can be. congrats sfgeekmom!

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  13. This process makes us relinquish control doesn't it? Sometimes that's just what's needed.

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  14. As the parent of a middle school student at Friends, I'll point out that the academics really ramp up in 5th grade. Plus, I have seen the results of my daughter's erb testing eerytime.

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    1. Can you say a little more about the academics in later years? How about the skill of test taking which will become increasingly important for getting into high school and in high school and college?

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    2. I have a middle schooler and a SFFS graduate. My 9th grader did very well in the high school application process. The workload increase in HS has been an adjustment but she has terrific study and organization skills that she developed at Friends. The workload level at Friends allows the students to take complte responsibility for their own homework, which is a really important expectation and skill for high school and beyond (and one that kids don't get the chance to develop in a lot of schools).

      Also, as the other middle school parent mentioned, the work definitely ramps up each year in middle school.

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  15. We had the same dream--maybe not as long or as prepared out. My husband and I dreamt of sending our daughter to KIP-CL and even were ready to put it #1 even though we knew the odds of getting assigned there were low. After touring our neighborhood school which has a great reputation, I immediately called my husband and told him we should put that school first and KIP-CL second as I didn't want to lose out completely. I told him we could always set up a tutor for her to teach her Korean (she has family that speaks Korean--her grandfather still lives in Seoul--so we also had resources to help in the effort). There are ways to not lose what you have already established. Just bc your child will be in an English speaking environment all day, there are ways to compliment that in their life around that that still preserves all that you have put in so far. I have a cousin-in-law who was born in the US, never attended a Korean speaking only school and still can switch back and forth between me (white girl by way of NJ) and her Korean speaking only grandmother. As with everything that is discussed on this blog (public or private, go back for our first choice or stay with what we were assigned, etc) we make what we are given the best it can be. Good luck and congrats!

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  16. "We have all tacitly agreed that is fine to educate one set child children on a SFUSD budget of $6500 in a system that is under constant strain and upheaval while we educate another set of children with a per capita budget of $25,000 or more."

    Yeah, but the price isn't telling you everything.

    The parochials are operating on slightly less per-capita than the publics, but get test scores comparable to the independents. Many of the privates have new shiny facilities, which is adding to your. For the publics and parochials, the capital cost of their facilities is either already depreciated. Also, there's overhead in terms of management, HR, etc. that are either handled by SFUSD centrally or by the Archdiocese. Also, the district can bulk-buy supplies and textbooks, and (some of) the Archdiocese's school's pool together to do the same. Also, the compensation for the principals in the independent privates can be $250k+. And don't forget the sales, marketing teams the independents employ. All those shiny young people at the private booths? Costing you.

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    1. After some time looking at the Form 990s for the private schools, it looks like the biggest cost is salaries, Shiny new facilities get paid for by fundraising, not tuition, and compensation for the heads of school pales in comparison.

      Salaries typically account for over 60% of annual expenses. Some schools have teachers on their board of directors, and their salaries on the Form 990 are $50k-$70k. Financial aid takes up another 8-18% of the expenses, with the "Big 5" schools spending less, 8% for Hamlin and Town, 11% for SFDS vs 15-16% for Live Oak and Friends in 2010-11)

      I will say, I was surprised by the range of compensation for the heads. Looks like the head of Town got $810k in compensation in 2008-09. The head of SFDS got about $500k, half in salary and half in retirement funds, plus a 300K loan in 2010-11. Compensation for the heads of Friends and Hamlin are both in the high 300K range. Presidio Hills and Live Oak, smaller schools, below 200K.

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    2. That's why Synergy is comparatively cheap ... no head, teachers just rotate that duty.

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    3. we are headed to synergy this fall and are really excited about it. very curious to see how it works with no administration, but everyone we've spoken to there raves about the school + the community. we are tempted to go for round #2 to get into a great public, but also feel lucky that as far as private schools go, synergy seems to have amazing programs and is much, much less expensive than the other private schools.

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    4. Wow - I can hardly believe those salary figures are for real. $810,000 in annual compensation for the head of Town in 2008/09! No wonder the tuition is so high - you would need 30 kids on full tuition just to pay that one salary.

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    5. My point was that while headmasters' salaries are an easy target, its a small percentage of a school's annual budget, which is about 12 million for most schools with 2 classes/grade. Salaries and benefits for teachers and other staff are by far the largest expense.

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    6. Catholic schools get funding from the church to supplement the tuition.

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    7. If the schools budget is $12 million, then a headmasters salary of $810,000 would represent 6.75% of the budget. Which doesn't seem like that small of a percentage to me.

      Anyway, interesting to see some of those numbers. I had no idea they were public record. Thanks for posting.

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    8. "Shiny new facilities get paid for by fundraising, not tuition"

      Friends looks like 10% of their expenses are depreciation, so not sure you are correct here. Also, they're forking out about 12% of their expenses in loans. Further, they're giving 18% of their expenses as being "grants", which I'd think is tuition assistance: if so, this is really a discount on tuition rather than an expense (i.e. their true revenue and expenses are about 20% lower than the nominal figures given).

      Given that, I'm getting maybe 25-30% of the expenses on depreciation and interest.

      "Salaries typically account for over 60% of annual expenses."

      I think you mean compensation rather than salaries. In which case, health insurance is a big component of that, and the independents are in a weak bargaining position compared to the parochials or SFUSD.

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  17. sfgeekmom, how were you able to get financial aid? I know at least five families who applied at Friends but were denied? I'm trying to get a sense for what income level qualifies as I will be applying next year with an aid request. You are lucky to get to go to private school for almost free: so many families I know have to scrimp and save to make tuition work. If you are given significant aid, do you also get to avoid contributing to their capital campaign (Friends is setting up an expensivee middle school scholarship program for disadvantaged students in the Mission which they expect current families to fund)? I understand they expect contributions of another $5-10 K per family on top of tuition. I'm very stressed about the costs of a Friends education.

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    1. To clarify, we received a fair amount of financial aid, but nothing close to a free ride. It's going to be a stretch, and I'm a little scared by what my finances will look like next year.

      Some thoughts: If you love the school but can't afford it with the financial aid offered, it's OK to ask the school to reconsider. Also, my impression is that the "Big 5" schools, with their large endowments and fewer number of students on aid, can offer substantially more financial aid to applicants at the same income level.

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    2. Which schools are considered the Big 5?

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    3. "Big 5" are Hamlin, Town, Burkes, Cathedral and SF Day.

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    4. Is this your only education option ? Financially stretching yourself or illiteracy? Is it that you love this particular school and there are no alternatives . Did you get a decent public or will try for round 2? What do people on financial aid do if they get laid off or have a financial emergency, when you're already stretched thin paying high tuition?

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    5. one issue to keep in mind. you have to reapply for financial aid every single year. Friends has often brought families in that represent significant diversity (here Asian and LGBT) with great aid packages, but then reduced over time so please put that potentially in your budget sfgeekmom. Could you attend if the aid was somewhat reduced in year 2 and 3? The problem with aid is that it's not guaranteed to stay at the year 1 ("recruitment year") level.

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    6. What was your SFUSD assignment? Will you go Round 2 just in case?

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  18. No it wasn't the only option. There are things I'm not willing to stretch for, home ownership, for example, and things I'm willing to stretch for. Education is one of the big ones for me. There are trade-offs I'm not willing to make, like retirement, and trade-offs I'm willing to make. Just told part of my family that we won't be joining them for an impromptu vacation that would have involved over $1000 in plane tickets plus lost pay at work (we'll be seeing them again in June).


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  19. Geek Mom, In some ways it sounds like you're settling for Friends, even though lots of people would wholeheartedly take a place there. What was your SFUSD assignment and will you go Round 2 to try to get your ideal program? Did you have in your mind a back up public since you know the odds for Lilienthal were slim? I know you have to recalibrate based on your disappointment but nothing is set in stone yet and be sure this is really what you want. You seem so focused on clear cut metrics. How you describe how the school operates and measures students progress seems a bit fuzzy math, which seems so not you or your approach to learning. Are you ready for that and the growing pains that go along with it?

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    1. On another thread SF Geek Mom mentioned she was assigned Jefferson for Round 1. Very good assignment but not what she was pursuing. Will you register there? Seems weird that she was completely shut out of immersion. Would definitely pursue Round 2, just to settle this once and for all. Good luck!

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    2. Okay, I admit I should have chosen Hamlin!

      To clarify, this was a happy ending. We were lucky to get into Friends and lucky to get Jefferson, a great school, and a testament to the improved lottery. In the old system, we'd have been 0/7. Thanks, SFUSD, for trying to make the system work better. I mean that sincerely.

      At the end of the day, I felt my child would be happiest at Friends. Parenthood leads us to all kinds of unexpected places in search of what's best for our children, who are after all their own selves with their own needs and personalities. This was one of those journeys.

      If my child is thriving, I'll be happy, and I don't need metrics to see that.

      But surely there are Quaker geeks out there?

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  20. Hi Geek Mom, Speaking as one whose 4 children have been to both on every level. While it's true you don't always get what you pay for and nothing is perfect you definitely don't get what you don't pay for and the SFUSD leaves a lot to be desired. Best bet go independent for as long as you can swing it. In the current atmosphere of political shell games and test prep teaching you won't regret it. Best of luck!

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    1. I really hope that Gov. Brown's proposal to increase school funding passes. It will make such a difference in public schools and go such a long way. Funding will increase from $7,250 per student to $11,171 per student for SF. Far short of the independents but will fill in some of the gaps.

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  21. So, this may not go over well, but: I am determined to keep my kid out of public till No Child Left Behind is gone. It's not the funding, facilities, teaching, socioeconomic and racial makeup, or politics of public school that I fear. It's the degradation of public education by testing culture, period. So I think that if an independent school offers you enough aid to stretch, it's worth it.

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    1. Maybe I'm missing something, but after moving my child from a private to an in-demand public elementary school, and being warned about this "testing culture", I haven't seen much evidence of it. Are there some SF schools where this is the norm? STAR testing is in the spring, though, so my child hasn't taken it yet.

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  22. I've had kids in the system for four years now (twins in third.) It's not all about testing. There so much more. The real testing doesn't even begin till second grade anyway. What's interesting is the curriculum. The Common Core curriculum/standards seem pretty impressive once you look at the details. In a parent/teacher conference, the teacher goes through in intensive detail (more than I really like) how your child is performing on each standard. He/she explains what is being taught, why it's being taught, how he/she is approaching teaching it, what flexibility he/she has in teaching it, even how he/she is working with fellow teachers to best teach. This year we've been moving toward the new standards (and teaching to them) in addition to the old CA standards. In truth, I leave reassured that the teaching is so comprehensive, especially as I see so much flexibility in teaching and extras too - art, dance, science, parent added projects, etc. Also, the kids don't really mind the testing. They get used to it, and in all honesty, they're going to encounter a whole lot more testing wherever they go. In some ways, it can be an asset to get some test-taking skills under one's belt. It's just not as bad as it typically gets portrayed. And things are changing for the better overall. I was just as anti-test as many of the posters with an entering Kinder several years ago.

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    1. Thank you for this. I too have been impressed by the curriculum at my son's public school and the level of detail in the evaluations. I've heard of parents in private schools having independent evaluations done so they can have a sense of where their child stands academically. That said, No Child Left Behind is very flawed policy. Maybe some schools "teach to the test," but they are generally the ones that are worried about losing funding based on their test scores. This isn't an issue with schools with solid test scores, as far as I know.

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    2. Thank you. This is very reassuring because some of the publics left a really good impression on me with their teaching and curriculum and it wasn't one size fit all rote learning.Also, all students have to take tests at some point. Yes standardized testing is a drag but there is not one private school parent not prepping their kids for PSAT and SATs when the time comes.

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    3. You are both welcome!

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  23. One thing you didn't mention is the lack of diversity. It was really important in your original search and you had certain goals like not more than 60% one group but not less than 15% another . Did you realize that was a bit overly engineered or that it won 't matter? Why have that criteria in the first place and now that you will have your child be very much a minority at her new school, can you give a little hindsight?

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  24. SFGeek, I have good news for you! We are going to give up our boy spot at CL (Korean immersion) as we need to leave for a job overseas. We hope you get the spot for your son as you appear to really deserve and want it! Best of luck - or to any other deserving parents who are interested in KI at CL. I'm sad to leave this city, but happy to make one family very happy with our sad news ...

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