Friday, February 8, 2013

Parochial School / Private School Acceptance Letters



Have you received your acceptance/rejection letters from parochial or private schools?  Please post!  We have heard that letters have started to go out from Notre Dame des Victoires (NDV) and St. Brigid School.

42 comments:

  1. Received letters from Star of the Sea and St. Monica's. Since other schools don't send letters out until March, how can they expect parents to make a decision since they want confirmation by 3rd week in February?

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  2. St. Brigid's required over $1K deposit by January 25th.

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  3. St Cecilia has sent letters out.

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  4. Holy Name accepts on a rolling basis. Received our acceptance last week.

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  5. Congrats on the acceptances! We only applied to privates so just have to sit tight and wait till next month. Gulp...

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  6. Wow, asking for deposits before other private schools and SFUSD notifies seems like a clear fundraising effort to prey upon anxious parents. So unfair.

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  7. It's not unfair at all. It may seem that way to those who are trying to game the system by accepting a spot at a school they don't plan to fill if they get their first choice independent or public. But for those of us who planned on going parochial all along, it is a huge relief to be done with all of this already. What I find somewhat unfair are the newer independent privates who require a contract to be signed when the deposit is made that states the parents will pay an entire year's tuition if they claim a spot that they don't fill (e.g., putting down a deposit for Alta Vista, while planning to bail if a spot opens for Stuart Hall). Isn't that the purpose of a non-refundable deposit?

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    1. Many of us are not trying to 'game the system,' but have no way to rank order schools across parochial, SFUSD and/or private school choices. So, the timing of notifications/acceptances could require that we hold a lower choice option until some other option is known to us. You don't need to be judgmental because some of us are considering options across school types. Just like you, we are working within a difficult system to find the best option for our family.

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    2. @9:01 I did consider options across all three school types, but had a couple of favorites that have notified already. There's no need to get snippy just because you are still waiting, your choices are your choices. And what you described is "gaming the system." Here is the definition: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/game_the_system

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    3. Gaming the system is defined in multiple sources with negative implications, which seemed unfair to me in your post. Anyway, I'm happy you found success in your quest!

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    4. Yeah, that's gross, that one year's tuition. It would be enough to stop me from applying. Not that I was impressed by Alta Vista anyway.

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    5. What's the story on Alta Vista, why were you not impressed? We are one year out from applying but have heard good things about the school only, so far. Would be interested to hear the negatives too.

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    6. See wordofthemutha's review. I'm not her, but it gives a good picture of what I disliked. Mainly, I think Alta Vista's head is completely snide about diversity issues. My sense about him is that people either love him or hate him. I was in the latter category. I thought he was a glad-handing phony with no interest in a kid's actual experience of diversity (which is NOT, as he told me, that "they don't notice differences"-- personal experience AND SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH show that that is patently untrue).

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  8. 2:52, do you know who else besides Alta Vista does that?

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  9. Agree with 2:52. It is a great way to weed out the families not committed to the parochial schools and only see them as a back-up. Alta Vista is doing the same thing. They realize that they are also seen as a back up.

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  10. I believe the privates and the publics switched their announcement days around recently, to avoid the problem where people accepted a public option while actually hoping for private. This resulted in a bunch of no-shows in August (SFUSD doesn't really have a way for dis-enrolling before the start of the school year, and some parents wouldn't bother, anyway), and a larger amount of shuffle/chaos during the first 2 weeks of the school year.

    Personally, I think the fairest way to do it would be to have both the publics and privates send out/announce acceptances around the same time, and for neither to require decisions before the other acceptances were out. Of course, the privates have a vested interest (financial) in doing it the other way.

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    1. i believe the independent/privates and sfusd have basically the same schedule (3/15 letters, more or less). only the parochial schools are doing it on an inconsistent schedule these days, right?

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  11. Any word from St Vincent de Paul? We were told we would get them by the 15th, but I can hardly bare the wait any more!

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  12. please tell me that is a typo.
    you can bear the wait.

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  13. My experience is that a lot of parochial schools admit on a rolling basis. As soon as they know they will accept your child, they will tell you.

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  14. All the parochial schools I've toured seem very old school and traditiional in their teaching style. Desks lined in a row, very trqditional curriculum, arts/music/PE once a week and black top playgrounds with few green spaces. Are they all like this or are any a bit more innovative? Just not sure if they will work for us.Is everything dictated by the Archdiocese?

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    1. Not all parochial schools are the same. They're not even all Catholic, though the vast majority in SF are. I know SF has 2 Lutheran schools, a Greek Orthodox school, at least 2 Baptist schools, and a Seventh Day Adventist school. There may be more. "Parochial" means associated with a parish church. The Catholic parochial schools are under the jurisdiction of the archdiocese, but they're not all the same. Notre Dame des Victoires feels a lot different than St. Charles Borromeo. They tend to emphasize traditional academics, have fairly basic physical plants, and have less art and music than you might find other places--not a lot of goats or gardening--but there is variety. St. Cecelia's, for example, is noted for its performing arts.

      Parochial school tuition is subsidized by the church as the education is considered missionary outreach (though the religious touch is much lighter at some parochial schools than others). Annual tuition typically runs in the $6,000 to $8,000 range for Catholic and Protestant denominations. That's not chump change, but it's relatively affordable. As a result, parochial schools tend to be a lot more socioeconomically diverse than the $25K per year privates or even some of the trophy publics.

      If you object to religion (which I think is different from not being religious), parochial school is not for you so don't bother. But I will say I found interesting that a non-religious family we know went parochial for kindergarten, then moved to a trophy K-8 public for first grade. They missed the values their kid was learning in parochial school and started taking their kids to Sunday school.

      There are also religious-affiliated schools that are not subsidized by a parish, and tuition is much higher--think Convent and Stuart Hall (Catholic), Friends (Quaker), Cathedral (Episcopal), or Brandeis (Jewish) where annual tuition and fees easily top $25,000, comparable to secular privates like SF Day.

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  15. I agree that this is not gaming the system. With a neighborhood school assignment you would know which school your child would go to. But under the current system there is no way to know. This creates a dilemma for parents. If they don't win the public school lottery should they be left high and dry with no acceptable alternative? It is simply smart shopping to get your child the best possible school given the admissions policies set up by the public and private school authorities. Such are the problems created by non-neighborhood-based assignment systems.

    I do agree that certain parochial schools are squeezing parents by requiring early monetary commitments. Most schools respect the need for parents to have a complete picture before making a final decision.

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  16. We got our acceptance letter from SVDP today! We are thrilled!

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  17. Congratulations!
    We got St. Gab's today too

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  18. So bummed there's been no activity on this site for so long. Not sure what I'm expecting, maybe just others to commiserate with about this long waiting period before we find out from privates which school community our family will be getting involved in for the next 9 years. Anyone else feeling super anxious?!

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    1. Me too! When we went through the Kinder application process for 2011-12, I found the buzz on this site to be comforting -- though admittedly anxiety provoking at times too.

      Now we have just one application in for Independent school second grade. I find myself hoping we get in, wondering how we'll pay for it and if the difference is truly worthwhile, what changing schools will be like for my daughter. I welcome people's expererience and information about weighing these decisions and handling the wait.

      Thanks.

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    2. Why are you changing?

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    3. We are mostly happy at our public school, but at times I feel the thin staffing and inconsistent quality. We are only considering one school, b/c it feels like a superior fit in terms of creative/engaging teaching, greater number of caring attentive adults and high quality art/music/theater/athletics/language/science built into the school day, still leaving time for unstructured time after school. Also not having to face the middle school question is a significant factor.

      If we don't get into our dream school, we will stay where we are. If we do get in it will be a very significant financial investment for us. Is that justifiable? I just don't know. I know my kid will be OK either way, but want better than OK.

      On the other hand, I love being part of making our public school a better place. Some of the teachers are fantastic. The free price tag gives our family alot of valuable flexibility.

      This is such a difficult process in SF. I have respect for the different choices people make. I'm sad when other involved families leave our school and I will regret contributing to the anxious feeling that it creates in a school community.

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    4. I have a similar situation. In the end, I get tired of thinking about it so much. It feels like it consumes too much of my emotional and psychic energy. At this point, I've decided that if we can afford it go private and if not go public. It's purely a financial question, because my child will be fine in either environment. He has a stable home life and involved, educated parents. Both environments present their own challenges. As long as you stay involved and committed, you child will thrive. If you can comfortably afford private and want it, go for it. If it's going to cause stress and make your family uncomfortable, then I'm not sure it's worth it for elementary. Save for middle school where you might really feel that you want the private or parochial environment. The 25K per year is a lot when you add it up over 9 or 7 or 5 years.

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  19. I have been checking the mail daily and NOTHING yet!
    If it is like this for kindergarten HIGH SCHOOL WILL KILL ME!

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    1. There is alot you can do while your child is in middle school to assure them in a good private high school, if that is what you are hoping for.

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  20. I'm in the same boat! Only TWELVE more days to go (for publics and independents) but it feels like the day will never come. In some ways I find the waiting more difficult than all of the events and busyness of the past few months.

    It really is too bad that the activity and community here has dwindled to this point. I find myself checking this board and Theschoolboards.com multiple times a week........

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    1. I'm antsy too. Not sure what I'll get by visiting message boards everyday, but it gives me something to fixate on, I suppose! :)

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  21. Ahhhh! I cannot wait any longer to find out! Anyone else losing sleep over K acceptances on Friday?! Its messed up that this is so much worse than waiting to find out if I got into my first-choice college or dream job!

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  22. just wait until High School, you have no idea

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  23. Less than 24 hours until D-Day. See you back on the board tomorrow. Good luck and can't wait to hear everyone's results!

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  24. Nervous! Best of luck everyone. Hopefully we will all get the fat envelope from the school we want. Otherwise if you get more than one acceptance and you know which one you're going to, please remember to start releasing spots so those waitlisted might get called! Good luck y'all!

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  25. So independent schools mail their letters today (the 14th). Does SFUSD mail their letters tomorrow (the 15th)? Or are we supposed to receive the letters from SFUSD on the 15th?

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  26. We got 4 letters today and are wait listed at all of the private schools we applied to so far - one letter remaining. Do the schools send out many rejections or do they wait list most applicants to "hedge their bets"? I am anxiously awaiting the Public School letters so that we know our options. Good luck everybody! I really wish everyone could get their top pick. We all want the best for our kids...

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