Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Data: Students who aren't poor do worse at poorer schools.

As requested, here's data showing that students who are not poor have lower academic performance at poorer schools.  Each point represents one school.  Outliers are labelled. 

A list of SFUSD elementary schools with average CST scores for non-economically disadvantaged students is at the end.  I've ordered it bythe percentage of economically disadvantaged 2nd-5th graders who took the CST at each school. This percentage is slightly different from the percentages for the school enrollment, used in the graphs and previously posted.


Your take: useful or not useful?




Sources:

School CST Scores for Students Who are Not Economically Disadvantaged

Grades 2-5, 2011-2012


School
 Economically Disadvantaged, as a % of students tested
English
Math
CIS at DeAvila
16%
414
468
Miraloma
16%
404
427
Clarendon
16%
423
467
Grattan
18%
417
447
Lilienthal
21%
405
443
Creative Arts
26%
381
394
Peabody
29%
418
445
Sunset
30%
418
452
Lafayette
30%
413
461
Yu
31%
408
464
Feinstein
32%
401
433
Rooftop
36%
404
431
McKinley
38%
409
427
Argonne
42%
395
451
Alvarado
43%
413
441
New Traditions
44%
407
449
West Portal
44%
402
430
Alamo
45%
403
449
Sherman
45%
415
450
King (Starr)
45%
390
447
Jefferson
47%
402
449
Commodore Sloat
48%
402
419
Milk
51%
405
424
Key
53%
398
430
Lawton
54%
408
460
Lakeshore
55%
366
388
Sunnyside
56%
402
427
Stevenson
57%
423
487
Ortega
59%
379
419
Fairmount
60%
387
395
Yick Wo
60%
411
444
Ulloa
63%
411
450
Parks
65%
392
421
McCoppin
66%
366
378
Sutro
69%
393
442
SF Community
70%
375
375
Flynn
72%
395
406
Buena Vista K8
72%
390
420
Revere
76%
384
423
Carmichael/FEC
77%
376
404
Monroe
78%
404
427
Garfield
78%
393
421
Webster
78%
344
375
Longfellow
80%
382
417
Guadalupe
80%
364
408
El Dorado
80%
336
363
Glen Park
81%
366
386
Cobb
83%
327
351
Edison Charter
83%
353
399
Sheridan
83%
378
410
Spring Valley
84%
384
401
Drew
84%
319
355
Taylor
84%
380
448
Chin
85%
463
516
Carver
87%
312
371
Hillcrest
88%
346
368
Vis Valley
88%
359
407
Marshall
88%
413
453
Chavez
89%
366
386
Sanchez
89%
341
335
Parker
89%
378
396
Junipero Serra
90%
313
354
Redding
90%
374
394
Muir
91%
365
373
Lau
91%
382
443
Tenderloin
92%
360
386
Cleveland
92%
342
365
Moscone
92%
378
395
Bryant
93%
294*
285*
Malcolm X
95%
321*
398*
Harte
96%
306*
328*

* 10 students or less, take this score with a grain of salt.
Source: http://star.cde.ca.gov/star2012/

3 comments:

  1. I am trying to understand where Creative Arts falls into all of this. I am concerned about the quality of their education and whether we should consider it on our list. We have toured and liked it, but have questions. Can anyone help explain what I am seeing here?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Creative Arts is a great example of a school that underperforms its demographics. It's more affluent, whiter, and has more educated parents than SFUSD. Given its demographics, I'd expect it have higher test scores than it does.
    Here's a few numbers: Looking at Creative Arts 2nd-5th graders who took the CST (STAR) last year, 80% are NOT economically disadvantaged, compared to 39% of SFUSD. In SFUSD, 2nd-5th graders who aren't economically disadvantaged outscored economically disadvantaged ones by about 50 points last year. Creative Arts is 51% white, compared to 15% for SFUSD. White 2nd-5th graders in SFUSD score about 30 points higher than average. 24% of its parents have graduate degrees or post-graduate education, compared to 14% of SFUSD. For SFUSD overall, these students score about 50 points higher.

    So yes, I would be concerned. FYI, API will not tell you this information because API isn't adjusted for demographics. STAR test scores are broken down by these categories. You can look this up for any school at
    http://star.cde.ca.gov/star2012/SearchPanel.aspx

    ReplyDelete
  3. You need Ritu Khanna.

    Kids in immersion program typically score lower on standardized tests. Much of the economic mixing in this town occurs at school with immersion programs, which is one possible explanation.

    We are a high income family at a high poverty, non-immersion school. Having watched the teachers in action for several years now, and having been privvy to data thanks to Ritu (who is f*ing awesome) - well, let's just say that the kids with resources at my school are doing really really well by any test score metric and well, outside of that narrow range, they are doing very well. Other kids at our school, well...the test scores could be a lot better.

    ReplyDelete