Saturday, October 1, 2011

St. Paul's Open House

St. Paul's in Noe Valley has an open house scheduled on October 27 at 6:30pm. No RSVP required.

As I hear of other open houses I will post. Please feel free to comment on any other open houses you are aware of.

21 comments:

  1. Fairmount Elementary is hosting an Open House on November the 10th beginning at 6:00 p.m. in the school cafeteria located at 65 Chenery Street. It will be held in English and Spanish. See the PTA website: www.wearfairmount.com for more information.

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  2. Good job St. Paul. In the U.S. Catholic School attendence is down 50% since the '60s in absolute numbers. In %, it's more. In San Francisco, a supposedly liberal city it's up, mainly to avoid attending school with minorities. Good job St. Paul, you make Noe Valley an 80% white neighborhood, have schools which are 15% white, like James Lick. Congratulate yourself on letting San Franciscans pretend they're liberal while really acting conservative, not to mention racist. Congratulate yourself on making de facto racism comfortable and acceptable for the masses. At least the monied masses. What a feel good moment.

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  3. 11:55: just because you wish you had the means to avoid minorities does not mean that others who send their kids to Catholic schools are doing to to avoid them.

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  4. Jeez, what a hateful post 11:55. Have you ever BEEN to parochial schools in SF? They are reasonably priced (typically $6K to $8 per year) and very ethnically diverse. Some people send their kids to parochial schools for religious reasons. Many in SF send their kids to parochial schools because the price is right, religion classes are handled in a way that reflects San Francisco sensibilities, and they don't trust the public school they got in the lottery. My kid is the only white kid in his class at his parochial.

    The $25K per year and up independent and religious affiliated schools (Town, Burkes, Convent, Stuart Hall, Cathedral, Brandeis, San Francisco Day etc.) are relatively white enclaves. That's where your wealthy white Noe neighbors are sending their kids, not to schools operated by your neighborhood parish churches.

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  5. Sorry, maybe I'm wrong in some cases. I just feel like those enclaves you mention don't reflect the spirit of Martin Luther King and wanting kids of different backgrounds to have equal opportunity and be friends, hold hands together, etc. Maybe some of the parochials are more like Dr. King's ideal. For me, I would rather have my kids go to public school so I don't cause segregation and give them classes on the side in religion or French, because I do think private school attendence makes it two San Franciscos and less progressive. I'm not religious, but I do want my kids to learn French but do that on the side at Alliance Francaise so that I don't cause more segregation and also throw away 10k in benefits for my children.

    America would be more integrated if we went to the same school but learned religion on Sundays. I've heard some people say Sundays are very segregated, most people go to churches with their own. Maybe that's changing. Catholic churches do seem the most integrated of any, racially.

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  6. @11:55 Get off your horse. It's lonely up there. I feel great that I don't want my child to go to a school with an API of 600. White, Black, What have you. I'd take a parochial over that any day of the week. I have a feeling you would too. Do your research before spouting your silly words.

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  7. But what causes it to be 600? Maybe it's all the middle class in the area showing they don't care about them or feel they deserve an equal chance and send the message they are of a lower caste, and need to be separated from their children. Brown v. Topeka said separate but equal makes you feel unequal. I think if you go to Marina or James Lick and see all the white kids, rich, in private school outfits, you don't feel wanted and you don't feel that society is giving you an equal chance. I think living up to Dr. King's dream requires some sacrifice, some sense that we are in this together and need to fix education for all, not just for our won flesh and blood and those who can't afford to are racially isolated. What you write may be lower on the horse, but it doesn't show a team effort to solving poverty, racism and inequality.

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  8. 11:55 If you'd like to give your opinion about private or parochial schools, please start your own thread. The original post was about providing information to parents. It's intent was not to discuss the ethnic make-up of schools - public, private, or parochial - and the merits of attending one school over another.
    Make your choice and enjoy it. Let others do the same.

    By the way, do your research before giving your opinion. Most parochial schools in San Francisco have students from a variety of racial and economic backgrounds. Do you actually have any stats on the ethnic make up of St. Paul's? I live close by and from my observation of the school yard and the children walking around the school it's definitely a racially mixed.

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  9. 1:43 - Please start your own thread. I think you're addressing a topic that is broad and not in the same spirit of the original post. I'm sure many people would like to discuss the issues you raise on a separate thread.

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  10. 11:55/10:12/1:43, aka KevinKane, consistently confuses his feelings with the facts. He is a poisonous force on the community files. He has two and only two points to make, ever, about any topic: 1) people who don't choose public school are racist, and 2) Asians are superior.

    That these two positions are themselves incoherent with one another seems never to bother him -- nor does the fact that "feeling like" something does not make it true.

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  11. Asians are unified as a group, even if poor they take much pride in academic achievement and are overrepresented at all the top Universities. Whites will throw everyone under the bus if it benefits their child. Even people who consider themselves liberal will cause segregation if it helps their kid. It is my contention that we won't solve our educational problems until we do it as a team, like South Korea or Sweden, we all make sacrifices. Here, the poor don't study and the rich don't try to help and consider them beneath knowing their children. The rich don't care about the poor, the middle class doesn't care and the poor don't care about themselves. In other countries, all 3 care. Actions speak louder than words. If you send your kid to Hamlin, you just don't care. I admire the Asian way. Kids in projects get into UCs, how many black or white kids in trailers or projects do that (inverse order)?

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  12. I am a longtime public school parent and only looked at parochials last year at high school. If you take a look, you'll see many of the parochials (ES through HS) are way more diverse than many of the publics. St. Paul's is largely kids of color - way more so than, say, Clarendon or Lillienthal.

    Sacred Heart HS is less white than SOTA and more ethnically diverse than Lowell.

    I'm not Catholic - a solid never baptized agnostic - but would certainly consider a parochial as a great option in SF.

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  13. " In the U.S. Catholic School attendence is down 50% since the '60s in absolute numbers. In San Francisco, a supposedly liberal city it's up, mainly to avoid attending school with minorities."

    Err, if that was so, St. Elizabeth's & Corpus Christi wouldn't have closed their doors in the last two years.

    Don't hate on the parochials: St.James, Mission Dolores, St. Anthony's, St. Peter's, St. Charles, DeMerillac Academy, are delivering quality education to a chunk of the community with not a lot of money at a low price point ($4-5K).

    Now the independents that gouge $25K out of their clients, they're really ramped up the price curve

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  14. 11:55 PM -- If you had ever set foot at St. Paul's you would see a nice mix of students -- way more diverse than many public schools, and almost any private school. Many of the families are solidly working class. Parents are your PG&E workers, your clerk at Home Depot, your UPS man, your electrician, with a smattering of professionals. St. Paul's has not been even close to a majority white in at least a generation. In fact, one on my kids was one of two white kids in a class of 30+. The other's class was more balanced, more like 5 or 6 white kids, the remainder made of mostly Latino and Filipino students and a few other Asian and African American kids.

    In any case, St. Paul's did a nice job with the kids they served, no matter what their ethnicity.

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  15. I still think the existence of private schools overall does more to divide our children than to unite our children. The idea that kids should be separated by their parent's ability to pay during their formative years sounds like the Jim Crow laws, with class replacing race. It's a very conservative ideology and concept. Sure you can say it's separate but equal, but I doubt it. I'm sure the people in Pacific Heights who shun Cobb, an almost all African American and poor school right in Pacific Heights with almost no kids from Pacific Heights, to go to Hamlin or Burke feel superior about it. It just seems wrong to me. It doesn't feel like a step in the right direction. It seems unfair and negative in just about every aspect. I don't think that's what Dr. King had in mind when he made that great speech. If you think it makes the world a better place, you're probably deluding yourself, I just doubt anyone really thinks it is fair or makes the world a better place to have schools like Burke and Hamlin. Then the rich pay a lower percent in taxes than the poor, according to Warren Buffet, because they supposedly work so much harder and everyone has an equal opportunity. I just don't buy it man. If you aren't part of the solution, you're part of the problem.

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  16. "I'm sure the people in Pacific Heights who shun Cobb, an almost all African American and poor school right in Pacific Heights with almost no kids from Pacific Heights, to go to Hamlin or Burke feel superior about it."

    Neither Hamlin or Burke are parochial schools.

    And I'm sure they look down their noses at the folks going to St. Brigid's or St. Vincent DePaul just as much as those going to Cobb.

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  17. 11:55 St. Paul's has historically and still stands as one of the most diverse schools in SF. Public or Private. You really have no idea what you are talking about. You owe their community an apology for your inaccurate and hateful remarks. If you are trying to act as a representative of public schools, you're doing yourself a disservice. Your lack of education and critical thinking skills is pretty magnified here.

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  18. 11:55/KevinKane will never listen or apologize. He has one drum to beat, and he will beat it regardless of the facts. His posts are embarrassingly badly written, off-topic, and off-the-wall. Just take a deep breath and know he has no credibility, and does not represent the typical public school parent.

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  20. We chose to send our daughter to St Paul Elementary in San Francisco after considering various factors, including but not limited to the curriculum offered, diversity, school administration, accessibility, finance, and old fashioned gut-feeling.

    We did our homework on many schools (well over a dozen), attended open houses, talked with other prospective K parents, talked with parents of those attending public and private schools, and read the online "reviews." We considered public, private parochial, and private non-denomination. St. Paul's Elementary on Church St was top 3 on the long list, and remained on the top of our short list.

    The school building is new and updated, the school grounds always look clean, and the children are well-behaved. Relatively easy drop-off and pick-up, considering being located in Noe valley. And the new principal is very receptive to the concerns of parents and teachers.

    Most importantly, my daughter comes home excited to talk about what she learned in the classroom. New words and concepts, songs and art work, friends and activities. It is always such a delight to talk with her about her school day.

    On a personal note, I knew right away that this was the right school for us when the K teacher greeted our child by name in one of the meet-and-greet nights before the start of the school year... a small touch but a huge and lasting impression.

    I would highly recommend St Paul Elementary to prospective parents.

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  21. My son is currently in kindergarten at St Paul’s. This was our private back up but for lack of lottery favor, we ended up here. It has turned out to be a great fit for my child, and he is very happy. The kindergarten teacher has great classroom management skills, and teaches the kids more than the basics. They learn social skills, responsibility and independence. My son does PE twice a week, and learns Spanish twice a week. We have 29 kids in the class this year, but they break into small groups for many of their activities, like Science and Library/Computer so it seems to work well. After school programs include chorus and drama. Our new principal listens, is committed and determined to better the school, and has made significant changes in the short time he’s been with us. Easy drop off and pick up. Hands down the nicest facilities as far as parochial schools go.

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