Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Parents for Public Schools: Library enrollment workshops

Let Parents for Public Schools help you find a public school for your child.

Enrollment workshops throughout San Francisco
  • Learn about the public school enrollment process
  • Meet parents from various public schools
  • Get tips and advice from parents who have gone through the process
Schedule of Library Events
Wed, Oct. 5 6:30-8:00pm Bernal Heights Branch, 500 Cortland Ave.
Wed, Oct. 12 6:00-7:30pm Mission Bay Branch, 960 4th St.
Wed, Oct. 19 5:00-6:30pm Parkside Branch, 1200 Taraval St.
Thurs, Oct. 20 5:30-7:00pm Ocean View Branch, 345 Randolph St.
Thurs, Nov. 3 10:30am-12:00pm Noe Valley Branch, 451 Jersey St.
Thurs, Nov. 3 6:00-7:30pm Ortega Branch, 3223 Ortega St.
Thurs, Nov. 10 6:00-7:30pm Richmond Branch, 351 9th Ave.
Thurs, Nov. 17 6:30-8:00pm Marina Branch, 1890 Chestnut St.
Sat, Nov. 19 3:00-5:30pm Western Addition Branch, 1550 Scott St.
Mon, Nov. 28 7:00-8:30pm Sunset Branch, 1305 18th Ave.
Sat, Dec. 10 10:00-11:30am Visitacion Valley Branch, 201 Leland Ave.

Schedule of School Events & Webinar
Fri, Oct. 14 9:00-11:00am Sanchez Elementary, 325 Sanchez St.
Tues, Oct. 18 9:00-11:00am Malcolm X Academy, 350 Harbor Rd.
Mon, Oct. 24 11:00am-12:00pm Webinar, Register at www.ppssf.org
Wed, Oct. 26 8:15-10:00am Junipero Serra, 625 Holly Park Circle

Register Online at www.ppssf.org or call 415.861.7077
Space is limited. KidsWatch service is not available.

Parents for Public Schools – San Francisco is a network of parents working together to build and ensure quality public schools for all children in San Francisco. Contact us at www.ppssf.org (415) 861-7077

15 comments:

  1. Forget them, they SUPPORT the current process. They aren't trying to help people overcome the unfortunate system. They put this system in place and are encouraging a vote against Prop H would would make it simple, you want to go to the mainstream school closest to you, you can, then a lottery for alternative or immersion schools. Prop H would guarantee every child could go to school close to home. PPS has decided to cast their lot in with the devil on this one. They aren't helping parents manoevre the system, they are endorsing a system they know some parents will not be able to get what they want in and will be forced to move. They are increasing traffic and decreasing study and family time. Shame on PPS. This post is a joke! You wouldn't need to advise people to overcome the problem if you didn't endorse the continuation of the problem. Morons!

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  2. "Prop H would guarantee every child could go to school close to home."

    Huh????? That sounds kind of ambitious, and totally different from what I've heard so far about this measure, which seems to be a non-binding recommendation rather than a guarantee. What am I missing here?

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  3. "Prop H would guarantee every child could go to school close to home."

    Complete lies. It's what the ballot signature people were saying. Vote NO on this deceptive, misguided, stupid proposition. Vote NO on H.

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  4. "Prop H would guarantee every child could go to school close to home."

    By totally removing choice that is. And screwing over the Mission, Excelsior, Vis Valley, and Bayview.

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  5. "It's what the ballot signature people were saying."

    Hey, the ballot signature people were saying would l siblings go to the same school (umm, the current system does already), and were saying their proposal would keep school choice (umm, no: it removes choice).

    The signature gathering people were lying their asses off about Prop H. Let's see it go down in November.

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  6. What if you don't want your neighborhood school? Seems like the current system covers more bases then a "all in" for the school down the street. I for one do not want to send my child to my neighborhood school. NO on Prop H.

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  7. Prop H is advisory only, with no power. Signature-gatherers will apparently say anything.

    Vote no on H because it's a stupid, toothless measure, however you feel about neighborhood schools.

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  8. YES on neighborhood schools. YES on H.

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  9. Revenons à nos moutons.

    Prop H aside, let's get back to PPSSF -- the subject of the post. Whatever assignment system ends up in place, the volunteer parent ambassadors of PPSSF have been consistently helpful in helping other parents negotiate it over the years. I encourage folks to go and to check out the event.

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  10. It seems like the anti prop H people are turning into complete assholes. They want people who are for neighborhood schools to vote against it on technicalities. On the one hand, they are telling people that disaster wills trike and kids will be forced out of their schools in January, mid-year, if it passes. On the other they're saying, vote against it, because it is nonbinding and won't help anyways. This won't show what percentage of people support or oppose negative schools. Prop H should have put in a clause clearly saying it wouldn't affect anything mid year, but the simplification committee already confirmed that. You can't think of everything. It would not cause kids to be moved mid year, but the teacher's union is spreading this lie around.

    Even if prop H fails, most people are for neighborhood schools.

    Now as for the Excelsior, etc., no, a middle class person with priveleges from the Excelsior should try to use that cultural capital to improve the schools there, not go to a school in the avenues and cause another family to leave the City. It actually causes the schools in the Excelsior to be less integrated. Why? Because only those who care a lot opt into the west side schools. Those who don't stay.

    There should be a clause that if someone is ousting someone closer they have to be an impoverished underrepresented minority. If they are middle class whites and Asians, they are making their own neighborhood schools less diverse under the guise of racial integration. Our schools are more segregated now than ever.

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  11. "prop H people are turning into complete assholes"

    whereas people in favor of Prop H were already assholes!

    It's fairly simple: people who have good schools in their neighborhood are in favor of neighborhood schools, people whose neighborhood schools are not-so-great, are not for "neighborhood schools". If you prop H'ers lived next to John Muir, would you still be so pro prop H? I don't think so.

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  12. "Now as for the Excelsior, etc., no, a middle class person with priveleges from the Excelsior should try to use that cultural capital to improve the schools there, not go to a school in the avenues and cause another family to leave the City."

    There aren't many middle class families of means of any race in Excelsior area (where I live). It's mainly working class. It is only in neighborhoods with a critical mass of middle class families of means (like Bernal, Glen Park) where prop H might make a difference to the neighborhood school. If you are only looking at general demographics of Mission, Excelsior, etc, you are not getting an accurate picture of what a school's demographics might be. For example, supposedly 31% of the Excelsior/Crocker area is supposed to be white, but the white population is mostly seniors who have lived here since it was an Italian neighborhood. The children here are mostly from recent immigrant families, nowhere near 31% of the children are white. I think the schools here already represent the Asian/Latino mix of the children, and most of them are already full of neighborhood kids. Prop H will prevent any middle class families from considering a move here, keeping the neighborhood a lower SES neighborhood and less diverse neighborhood.

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  13. "There should be a clause that if someone is ousting someone closer they have to be an impoverished underrepresented minority."

    Actually, there should be a clause that if your neighborhood school scores above 820, then you forfeit your chance to get a spot in citywide, immersion & alternative schools. Which shouldn't matter because according to Prop H "San Francisco residents and parents have declared time and again that they support a neighborhood-based school assignment system." So y'all won't mind giving up the seats in K-8s and immersion programs to those of us not so lucky to be assigned to a sought-after school, high performing school? Or is it a case of wanting to have your cake and eat it too?

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  14. ...according to Prop H "San Francisco residents and parents have declared time and again that they support a neighborhood-based school assignment system."
    ----
    Except when they DON'T -- you don't see the Prop H folks clamoring for Muir or Cobb.

    The facts are: Families what a quality school FIRST and proximity/neighborhood only SECOND to that.

    Prop H is a crock - SFUSD (and the backers of Prop H) should be focusing on quality first. There is no data anywhere, zip, zero, that shows neighborhood schools create quality. It's their hunch - and plenty of us that opted for choice over neighborhood know about building school communities. It starts with WANTING to be at a school.

    Prop H simply doesn't address supply and demand. They should have started there -- but, oh, guess that is too complicated (because it IS.)

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  15. "Even if prop H fails, most people are for neighborhood schools."

    Except when they have to choose for their kid, that is. Then 3/4 of parents decide they want something else.

    But never mind that! Prop H backers know best what's good for you!

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