Monday, April 4, 2011

A Tale of Two Schools

They are sisters on the surface. If one were to judge their kindergarten classes on paper, it would be hard to distinguish between the schools. The composition of the classes are remarkably similar, with among the highest percentages of white students in the District. Location, location, location! The attendance area of one school encompasses the wealthiest zip codes in the City, while the other attendance area is located in the far reaches of hill country. Both schools got the density tiebreakers for their respective attendance areas. But that is where all the comparisons stop, because one school is the darling of the District (requested by 54% of attendance area families) with 1797 total requests and 322 first-choice requests, while the other school is shunned by the District (requested by 2% of attendance area families).

The Schools? Cobb and Clarendon!

Here are the statistics for the choice offers (AA for attendance area):

Cobb: 0% sibling non-AA, 1% sibling AA, 2% CTIP1, 1% AA

Clarendon: 34% sibling non-AA, 11% sibling AA, 36% CTIP1, 10% AA


Here are the statistics for the racial/ethnic composition of all offers:

Cobb: 4% African American, 16% Chinese, 4% Latino, 62% White, 12% Other Asian, 1% Other

Clarendon: 2% African American, 10% Chinese, 13% Latino, 53% White, 17% Other Asian, 5% Other

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet!

- Donna

68 comments:

  1. Awesome post! It would be great to see the final stats after school starts. If everyone from Round 1 took their spots, what would Cobb be in 5 years. Darling?

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  2. API
    Cobb = 2
    Clarendon = 10

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  3. Actually Cobb is rated 5 now.

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  4. That 5 is a Great Schools rating, their API is indeed a 2.

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  5. Are you trying to make the point that race matters less than teacher quality? How do you explain the difference in performance of these two schools?

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  6. I suspect that the racial makeup of the students that will actually attend Cobb will be quite different than the offers.

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  7. Carnac the Magnificent said...

    Since majority of K students receiving offers at Cobb did not request Cobb, it is safe to assume that (1) they are families of relative means who went 0/10 and were assigned to “their attendance area school or closest school with openings,” (2) most families will reject this offer, and (3) the composition of the K class in August will be very different.

    The API of the students in upper graders does not predict the API of an incoming K class, esp. when the demographics shift. The demographics of the K students receiving offers to Cobb do not match the demographics of the students in upper grades at Cobb; they match Clarendon. The similarity in demographics between K students receiving offers to Cobb and Clarendon suggests that these students would perform similarly in standardized tests.

    If K students receiving offers at Cobb this year (and in subsequent years) actually enrolled, would Cobb become the next Miraloma? Yes! This is the metamorphosis of a hidden gem.

    Even though families will not accept their offers to Cobb, did the new student assignment lottery fulfill its objective?

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  9. "If K students receiving offers at Cobb this year (and in subsequent years) actually enrolled, would Cobb become the next Miraloma? Yes! This is the metamorphosis of a hidden gem."

    It isn't as if Cobb was a hidden gem. It has been a festering sore. If you put all the Lowell students at Mission, Mission would take on the mantle of Lowell. There is no organic improvement process at work via assignment. You can improve one via demographics, but you harm another as a result. Only if the assignment process functions to keep people from going to private will it have an salutary effect on the district at large.

    School improvement is not strictly defined by the demographics. If it were, SFUSD could submit the necessary applications to the CDE and go home, leaving the schools on their own. Demographics is a major consideration, but a great school needs a high quality teaching staff and far-thinking management. If the SES does indeed go up, and that is unclear as yet, the score will improve. But they could improvement much more with a reforms to changes in seniority, with NCLB gone and with class sizes reduced. The difference between a good school and a great school is not strictly demographics.

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  10. It would require leadership and a strong plan to convince many parents to take the leap with Cobb. Reading about independent K placements this year, there seem to be perhaps more families who didn't get the acceptances they hoped. If a critical mass were assigned to Cobb, they banded together, and decided to enroll, then things might start to significantly improve. Kudos to the parents at Webster who are trying this.

    It seems that many of the right ingredients exist at Cobb...but will leaders emerge to help create a turn-around? Too early to know...

    If I were an administrator at Cobb, I would personally speak with every single family, describe a vision to improve the school, and try to enlist their support.

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  11. "If one were to judge their kindergarten classes on paper, it would be hard to distinguish between the schools. "

    Golly, I guess it depends which "paper" you look at. Here are the test score results, of the schools compared:

    CST English ,2nd graders
    Cobb, % below proficient: 94%
    Clarendon, % below proficient: 15%

    CST Mathematics, 2nd graders
    Cobb, % below proficient: 87%
    Clarendon,%below proficient:5%

    CST Science - Grade 5
    Cobb, % below proficient: 23%
    Clarendon, % below proficient:9%

    Ok, maybe there is more to schooling than test scores, but the scores at Cobb are truly abysmal. To not factor that in, when comparing the schools, is ridiculous.

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  12. I'm one of the Webster parents. I think perhaps a difference there is that the Spanish Immersion program there has already attracted a broader demographic, so our leap of faith in putting our kids into the GE track there is already based upon a lot of hard work that has gone before.

    perhaps Cobb would be a good site for a new immersion program?

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  13. Gee, I wonder why Cobb is shunned.

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  14. I thought that Cobb was overwhelmingly AA. Does this mean that the majority of students who attend Cobb are those whose families did not participate in Round 1?

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  15. Offers are one thing: the crowd that fills Convent, Stuart Hall, Town, Hamlin, SF Day etc. try the lottery thinking they might take Sherman or Claire Lilienthal if they get lucky. They strike out at these high-demand schools and SFUSD offers them Cobb because it's the closest school with openings.

    Actual enrollment is another thing.

    As of 2009-10 SARC, Clarendon:
    4.7% African-American
    33.5% Asian
    7.8% Latino
    30.5% white
    19.0% multi or no response
    15% socioeconomically disadvantaged
    The PTA raises $250,000 K or more per year. It verges on being a private public school.

    As of 2009-10 SARC, Cobb:
    50% African-American
    6% Asian
    14.2% Latino
    14.2% white
    69.6% socioeconomically disadvantaged.
    Does Cobb even have a PTA?

    The relative academic performance of Clarendon and Cobb has already been posted. With maybe one exception (Moscone if memory serves), any school with almost 70% socioeconomically disadvantaged students that is not predominantly Asian struggles academically. People who can afford SF Day, Convent, Town etc. are not going to take a chance on Cobb just to be public-spirited.

    Similarly, lots of reasonably well-off Cole Valley/Upper Haight/NOPA families get offered John Muir in Round 1. The school is still so challenged (far worse than Cobb academically) that those families either ride out the lottery until something better comes along, move to the 'burbs or go private.

    Cobb and Clarendon may both be roses, but the former has a lot more aphids than the latter. And Clarendon's location is actually fairly central.

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  16. We were assigned to Cobb for our second grader. Cobb was not on our list. We went 0/6 from our list. We will not be accepting Cobb - primarily because our 5th grader was assigned to a different school that *was* on our list. Cobb is not in our attendance area either.

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  17. Aphids? Ouch. I hope you didn't mean the kids in particular racial/ethnic categories.

    Putting immersion programs into schools that look insurmountably challenged has worked on the SE side, and people living in the center and northwest sides have expressed interest in immersion programs. They are the great integrators, sort of, except that the two tracks are often quite unequal. Still, Flynn and Webster are two immersion programs where parents seem willing to test the GE on the basis of the strength of the parent communities drawn in by immersion, so it could be win-win.

    But the other thing to consider is that all this stuff about getting parent communities to bring up the schools is a form of privatization -- PTA money is private, after-tax money, and volunteer time is unpaid labor. As long as schools must depend on private resources, they will be unequal, period. I can't bear all these people (mostly in the forum) who blame parents for going to private school, when public school practically is private school at this point.

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  18. Don't forget that Cobb had the Montessori program, but that there was apparently so much hostility between the Montessori and GE programs, that the district moved the Montessori program to another location.

    We were assigned Cobb (not our "assignment area school") last year (0/7) and went with the one independent school to which we were accepted. Cobb's scores were simply too low and the reputation of not wanting outsiders to come in to "improve" the school meant that it was not a place at which we felt welcome or thought our daughter would thrive. Plus, we are a family where both parents work. We are happy to volunteer occasionally and donate to our children's school, but we simply do not have the time to work with other parents to turn-around a struggling school.

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  19. "If one were to judge their kindergarten classes on paper, it would be hard to distinguish between the schools. "

    To 9:26 AM - This statement is correct with respect to the K students who received offers in March. The statement is not alluding to a comparison based on the upper grades. The test scores that you cite are for upper grades at Cobb and have nothing to do with the potential scores of the children who received offers in Round 1. When a school is transitioning from dandelion to rose, you must wait several years before the test scores become relevant. I do not expect the majority of families who received offers to Cobb will go to Cobb. But if they did, test results for their children would not be available until 2015-2017.

    A poster named Caroline has shared her story of Miraloma many times on SF K FIles. When her child was assigned there in the 90s, it was a school that she admits she rejected outright, as did most families in SF. In those days, the majority of students were bused to Miraloma from Bayview and Hunters Point. It was so under enrolled that it may even have been facing closure. Test scores were low.

    So what changed at Miraloma to go from shunned to darling? Hint: Not the location nor the building nor the teachers.

    And lucky be the siblings who took the majority of seats this year. They are riding a wave of good fortune due to their parents' forward looking philosophy years ago, including the mantra "Test scores don't matter. My child will thrive anywhere."

    To 10:12: The SARC that you cite for Cobb is probably identical to the SARC for Miraloma when it started to evolve into a "hidden gem." There was no PTA and no fundraising when the first wave of parents chose to enroll. Miraloma now raises about the same as Clarendon. Yes, hidden gems have aphids! If they didn't, they wouldn't be hidden.

    I am not suggesting that Cobb is a hidden gem, because a school isn't a hidden gem until families by the masses chose to enroll there, to nurture it, and to love it. I just think all the slams against Cobb by citing low test scores are irrelevant to what is possible by 2015. Do I think Cobb will change? Unlikely, given the current perceptions. Cobb is a little school in a great location that needs a (pretty massive) paradigm shift.

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  20. 11:32 AM again:

    PS I forgot to mention that the teachers, principal, and staff must embrace the ideas and share the vision. That was probably the most powerful force behind that Miraloma facelift.

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  21. Maybe 50% of invited parents will accept and that will be the beginning of something new? Maybe some parents assigned to Muir will come to Cobb together and start making a change? At this point, the future is unknown. But the post makes it clear that a change could happen if the invited families took their spots.

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  22. Big difference between Clarendon and Cobb is that there are no less than Hamlin, Stuart Hall, Convent, Town, Presidio Hill School, St. Vincent De Paul all within walking distance or a short reach from Cobb. Cobb's not going to turn around its test scores. There is no desire to change as evidenced by the treatment of the Montessori program (which will now likely take up some nearby neighborhood students at is new location. The Board of Ed should have shut down the GE program and turned the school into a Montessori school. T

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  23. It is interesting to look at the breakdown of the API scores (only available if the differences reach significance, so not always there if a particular group has a small presence).

    For example if you look at Miraloma in 2007 when the overall score was 772. the white/asian score was 869 and the socioeconomically disadvantaged score was 658. The difference in scores between schools reflects mainly the differences between the students.

    A fairer way to compare cobb would be to look at a school with a similar demographic and has how it looks relative to that. Comparing Cobb and Clarendon is apples to oranges.

    It is likley that your child would get a very similar score on the API test whether he/she was at Clarendon or Cobb. Of course there are other things that draw parents to a school, but test scores are a very crude measure, and they are not measuring anything much other than the background of the student body IMO

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  24. 1:20 wrote: "It is likley that your child would get a very similar score on the API test whether he/she was at Clarendon or Cobb. Of course there are other things that draw parents to a school, but test scores are a very crude measure, and they are not measuring anything much other than the background of the student body IMO"

    Of course it doesn't mean my kid would score that low, but what it does mean is that the teaching will be geared to a very low level of achievement, and you can bet a good portion of the day will consist of not much more than crowd control.

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  25. This post comparing Cobb to Clarendon is ridiculous! They are completely different schools -- the data about who was offered placement is meaningless, since as other posters have mentioned, many of them will not accept.

    Additionally, I find it frustrating when people put the onus on the parents (rather than the school district) to try to turn failing schools like this around. Why would any parent who has the choice purposely send their kid to a failing school? Of course they're going to flee to a better public or private option.

    No one in their right mind wants their kid to be the one to have to tough it out with all the ghetto kids from Western Addition, so that in 5 years, the school's halfway decent.

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  26. 1.37, I do think it is very important, when considering a lower test score school to consider the ability of the teachers there to meet the needs of all kids, with a wide range of abilities, and also to see how rowdy the kids are and how well the classrooms are managed.

    However you may find that some schools that look poor on paper re test scores actually look pretty good when you look at the classrooms and the teachers.

    And 3.30, do we we really want segregated schools? All the poor kids in one and all the well off in another?

    The best way to improve the educational prospects of those western addition kids is for them to go to school with kids like ours, with parents like us who get involved. Ghettoized schools are doomed to fail. I really enjoyed this editorial on the issue.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/22/opinion/22herbert.html?_r=1&scp=3&sq=herbet%20school&st=cse

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  27. 3:57 p.m., do you forget that the current Cobb general ed parents do not want change at their school and view it as successful?

    "Why should you uproot those kids?" said Deborah White, whose granddaughter attends Cobb's general education program. "That's a community school." http://articles.sfgate.com/2009-12-07/news/17183156_1_montessori-program-general-education-program-school-board

    Neither do the teachers. UESF described Cobb as "a very sucessful general education program."
    http://www.uesf.org/educator/June09_EDUCATOR_web.pdf

    Yet, the fact of the matter is that the test scores are atrocious. The Board should have stuck to its plan of the Montessori school but it caved.

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  28. "The best way to improve the educational prospects of those western addition kids is for them to go to school with kids like ours."

    Ummm...That's all well and good, for the Western Addition kids, but what about my kids? Should they not get the chance to go to a GREAT school and be in classes with children who want to learn because their parents value education? Should my kids not get to be in classes with other smart, well-behaved children?

    Also, re: the comment about segregation. I would be very happy for my children to go to school with poor children of any race, as long as their parents value education and they are bright. Cobb does not attract such a population of parents and we all know it.

    Also, while I understand that every child deserves a great education, this is the school board's obligation to fill not mine. Why would I sacrifice my child's learning and education for someone else's?

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  29. What a ridiculous post. The author chose a few points of comparison that she thinks prove her argument -- and ignored all the other points of comparison that don't.

    The fundamental problem at Cobb is that the administration does not want to change and is hostile to families who attempt changes. Good luck with the "Miraloma Miracle" in that environment.

    Something like one or two families from the Cobb attendance area requested the school as their first choice. That represents a vote of confidence from no one, of any racial or socio-economic background. Without the district deciding to reboot the school, the neighborhood will not go there.

    I'm all for cheering on public schools, but this kind of low-thought boosterism doesn't do the district any favors and drives people away.

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  30. 5:33
    Your child needs to go to public school with kids who are representative of this city's population. If you want to segregate with other families like yours, then go to private school or move out of the city.
    The thing people forget is that the undesireable schools in "bad" neighborhoods house wonderful, smart kids too. These kids are the real ones getting the shaft by segregation. They bear the burden of being at a school where there is a predominance of low income/underprivileged kids and the accompanying problems.
    The people of this city need to take ownership of all its children. The city is responsible for getting all kids a "GREAT" education, despite what their parents do or don't do.

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  31. "If a critical mass were assigned to Cobb, they banded together, and decided to enroll, then things might start to significantly improve."

    If the District was really interested in using their costly outreach program to good effect, (be proactive as they say)they would stop trying to no avail to convince black and Latino families to take a bus across town and instead get the movers and shakers together and develop the critical mass to generate school improvement at school like Cobb.

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  32. "Your child needs to go to public school with kids who are representative of this city's population. If you want to segregate with other families like yours, then go to private school or move out of the city."

    Monica, on what basis do you purport to know what another person's needs ought to be. None other than the US Supreme Court has decided that it is not the role of government to force a school district to create assignment policies that mirror the larger demographic mix of a city. Your information is about 50 years out of date.

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  33. "Also, re: the comment about segregation. I would be very happy for my children to go to school with poor children of any race, as long as their parents value education and they are bright. Cobb does not attract such a population of parents and we all know it."

    Do you actually know any of the kids at Cobb, or their parents? The one I knew was black, lived in the western addition, and had a single mom. She fit your profile except she was bright and her mother valued education.

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  34. Re. 9:15's comment about how Cobb administrators should reach out to prospective families:

    Yes, they should. No, they won't.

    They don't want to change. They'll sit tight until dwindling enrollment finally forces the district's hand.

    Imagine if Clarendon had pushed out the JBBP program. That's pretty much what Cobb did to the Montessori program.

    If everyone from Round 1 who got Cobb took their spot this year, and then tried to make changes, they'd get a big fat "Talk to the hand!" from the administration. Such input is not welcome.

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  35. Getting the District to do anything that generates from the community instead of their inimitable braintrust is unlikely. I remember having a conversation with a administrator at 555 a couple years ago. . She seemed to be more interested that I refer to her as doctor than anything else I had to say.

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  36. Most folks are sheep.

    They will follow the pioneers, the parents willing to step into a mediocre school and turn it into a great school.

    People are waiting for the pioneers to blaze the trails at Cobb.

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  37. One such pioneer is Lisa Schiff, the school beat writer for Beyond Chron. She was instrumental in turning around McKinley and now she's doing it at Everett. I say this even though I don't particularly agree with her politics. But school and education ought to be beyond political divisiveness, for the sake of our children. She's a better person than I am because I could not have done what she did.

    That said, I don't think parents are sheep. That doesn't mean some are not more risk-averse when it comes to their kid's education. If the district would put its outreach into getting motivated parents together to help overcome the reservations some might have, they would do the district a much larger service than trying to convince people to abandon schools near their homes. Positive affirming outreach - not this cynical we-know-better kind of outreach.

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  38. Lisa is great, but her kids are not at Everett, and it is totally creepy to mention where other people's kids go to school.

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  39. Only if you live in some paranoid parallel universe. What's creepy and weird is taking a personal compliment and twisting it to make it out to be something that it is not.

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  40. Her kids are not at Everett, please stop writing about things you know nothing about.

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  41. I will say I'm a Schiff Sheep follower. For me, all it took to consider McKinley several years back (when it wasn't darling) was reading her talking articulately about her childrens' experience there. Literally, that was enough for someone generally willing to look beyond the beaten track but not a massive risk taker.

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  42. I would have gladly sent my kid to McKinley, but they didn't let children in special education be mainstreamed there.

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  43. Has anyone considered that there are a lot of parents who don't WANT to be "pioneers?" Being a pioneer is a thankless role. You invest time, (most likely) money, and *hope* that a school gets better over time.

    If being a "sheep" means that I can get my kid in a school that's already successful - then count me in as a sheep.

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  44. What "change" needs to happen at Cobb? People keep saying the administration is opposed to change and if people went there and tried to change something they would be met with opposition. What kind of changes are you talking about? I know nothing about this school. I am just asking.

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  45. I think it's very true that many people just don't want to be pioneers. It is hard and can be thankless. It does't make you a bad person to realize it's something you're just not drawn to, or have the stomach for. But I also think that there are some people who truly relish the role. You can see them getting fueled by it (and I don't mean this in a bad way.) For them, it's about something bigger than their own kid's experience. It's about that too, but it's also about a larger purpose. They're driven by purpose, and we're lucky to have them around. They don't have to be demagogues to be motivated in this kind of way. And they get something out it that goes beyond the school experience of their child/ren.

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  46. The resistance to change comment about Cobb refers to a debate between two camps at Cobb last year (or maybe it was the year before.) SF Montessori was on site as was the GE program. The intent was to grow the Montessori program beyond preschool to a full elementary school. One option was to house that program at Cobb. Some of the Cobb GE program teachers and some of the GE families were resistant to that idea, suggesting that the Montessori program (which was attracting a different group) would be pushing out the GE program. The whole thing became an uncomfortable polarizing situation, which was unfortunate. The Montessori program moved to a different site.

    But that tension may have had something to do (not all) with two programs with very different philosophies in the same school, and also with the new program being perceived as pushing out the old program. So not sure that situation would happen again. I also suspect given the publicity that Cobb GE teachers/families would be much more careful in their reaction to chance or proposed change in the future. For one thing, with low enrollment, change will happen -- it has to in this budget climate.

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  47. interesting article on gentrification. reminds me of Cobb and Montessori

    http://www.joannejacobs.com/tag/gentrification/

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  48. Don: I do not claim legal knowledge of what the district is supposed to require. (I think everyone here is entitled to speak from opinion, informed or otherwise, so I don't have to claim special knowledge or authority).
    However, I do not argue that the federal government should force a school district to ensure desegregation. Anyway, does the ruling say that the district cannot address segregation? Though none of that is my point.

    My point is that if the district cares about turning schools around, it should have a system that spreads the burdens and the wealth around. It is insane that people in this city have a public school selection system that perpetuates such massive inequality.
    People with means are able to corner the market on the good schools. People are able to stick with their own kind. They even think of it as a right.

    What is worse is that our district is relying on groups of educated familes to make a school's scores go up--but do kids with low scores actually score better as a result? Plus. this city doesn't have enough parents to overrun all the schools so that they are all "good" schools.

    I am reposting the article someone else mentioned, because I think it is key here
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/22/opinion/22herbert.html?_r=1&scp=3&sq=herbet%20school&st=cse

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  49. I don't know why this is the post that finally got to me, but I think using AA instead of African American just pushed me over the line. get ready for rant...
    You all sound like a bunch of very polite racists, worrying that your child will not get into the perfect white school with the perfect white kids..not all of your sons and daughters will get in to Harvard or Stanford either. I just want to scream "relax!" Public school, like the library, is for everyone, and you are disrespecting everyone that you dis on this site. I used to read this thing regularly, but never again. You all should be ashamed. And yes, my son goes to public school in San Francisco and its not a popular one and we are fine. goodbye.

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  50. Re: previous post: We should all be ashamed.... for being racists?

    If you cannot distinguish between one and another, you shouldn't be blogging... or driving.

    To answer 9:42 - I'm not sure what question your asking of me.
    You seem to be speaking from your heart and your sense of what is right. But the District has certain legal obligations that make policy somewhat more difficult than what it would take to get a few people together to agree on a strategy.

    I would be happy to respond to you if you like, but I'm not clear on your questions. They were perhaps rhetorical?

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  51. I will say that you kind of hit the nail on the head. You said that the district should try to spread the wealth around (demographically), but you also said there are not enough higher achieving families to accomplish that task. There is the dilemma. So it makes sense to have a policy that encourages more of these more able families to stay within the public education system. Would neighborhood school cause a net gain or a net loss?

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  52. 11:02 The person you are referring to is killing this blog, and drives many people away, and the moderators do nothing about it, and his constant insults, such as:

    "We should all be ashamed.... for being racists? If you cannot distinguish between one and another, you shouldn't be blogging... or driving."

    He writes insulting things like that, and then whines to the moderators (who do not moderate, and that is the problem here)that people are "defaming him".

    What they are doing is snapping back at his constant unpleasantness and insults.

    Sorry you are leaving the blog, as so many have, now the Don/Floyd/Jack/Justin/Jeff disease has polluted it.

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  53. In one of his numerous "conspiracy theory" posts, in the forum, he wrote this:

    "And if Kwame and Kaneesha want to go to their neighborhood school it is because their parents don’t know what's best for their children. "

    OMG, appallingly racist! And ugly.

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  54. Apologies to 11:02 PM. I will update the post.

    - Donna

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  55. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  56. Anyone can see by reading the post before mine that I was quoting that person who was referring to everyone on this thread as racist. That was pretty clear so I'm not sure why someone is attacking me for pointing out the error of her ways. I was trying to say it was unfair to call all of you racists.

    Then she (the one attacking me) goes on to accuse me for the hundredth time of sockpuppeting when she has been informed by the moderator himself that this accusation is incorrect. That does not dissuade her. There are other people in the world who favor neighborhood schools besides me. A recent poll has it at 74%.

    As for my Kwame comment, in context it meant exactly the opposite of what she claims. Read it for yourself in the CTIP Conspiracy on the community side.

    This what happens when a person is so filled with anger she is willing to say anything to make a case. The fact that I authored the neighborhood school measure might be the reason she is trying to paint me as a racist. (But I couldn't really say what goes on in her mind.) Tell that to my wife who is not the same race as I am.

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  57. Why is 11:02 calling me and all of you racists? Because I want to give my son a good education? Because I will not accept any less than that? I'm not blaming Don for calling her out on that. I'm glad he did. Someone had to do it. Where are all the rest of you? Don't call someone a racist for no good reason. That is a horrible thing to say about a person. If she has said goodbye I say good riddance.

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  58. Cobb with only 4% African American enrollment? You have got to be kidding. Anyone who has ever visited or toured this school would know that is a ridiculous statement.

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  59. "4% African American" is the statistics for the placement offers that were mailed in March 2011. It has nothing to do with the currently enrolled students or the actual kindergarten class in August 2011.

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  60. "Then she (the one attacking me) goes on to accuse me for the hundredth time of sockpuppeting when she has been informed by the moderator himself that this accusation is incorrect."

    No, the moderator said he could not "prove" it was you, he never said the accusation was incorrect.

    You're just using other people's IP addresses now, now that you know you can be caught, as you were caught on sfschools pretending to be the mother of a Kindergartner, and a blue collar guy, and all the other puppets.

    How does being married to an Asian prove that you are not racist, when you write racist things all the time?

    Now I am remembering all those emails from other people:
    ignore the troll ...
    ignore the troll ...
    ignore the troll ...

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  61. She sees all - Karnac the Magnificent.

    Imagine me to be all the people you want if that's what gets you off.

    Now back to the world of the sane.

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  62. What makes Moggy tick?

    When all you have is a hammer everything looks like a nail.

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  63. "You all sound like a bunch of very polite racists, worrying that your child will not get into the perfect white school with the perfect white kids..not all of your sons and daughters will get in to Harvard or Stanford either."

    Wow, chip on the shoulder much?

    I am quite certain that the reason folks aren't enrolling their kids at Cobb is:

    a) The API scores
    b) The *type* rather than *race* of kids there

    How many successful, black middle-class families do you think send their kids to Cobb? NONE! They get them into better SFUSD schools, leave for the 'burbs, or go private just like the white and Asian families with means.

    Just like the white families, black and Asian families don't their kids attending a failing school with kids whose parents don't value education, are probably on welfare, and potentially are on drugs.

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  64. 2:50;

    Thank you for also saying in your own way what I was trying to say about this unfair attack upon people who just want to educate their children properly. I'm not expecting Moggy to start attacking you for saying it, though. She has a one track mind.

    I appreciate your stepping up to the plate to counter people when they make outrageous claims of racism. We should all be standing up to these fraudulent accusations.

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  65. I need to thank Don. For way too long I've been addicted to this blog for no rational reason. It's true that I've learned a lot about many education issues in our city, but for the last few years I haven't had a child going through the assignment process and yet I couldn't seem to stop checking in to see how others were handling the new system and how/if perceptions of schools were changing. Finally, I realize that thanks to Don, there is nothing worthwhile left of this blog. Judging form the marked decreases in posts by anyone other than Don, I'm sure I'm not alone. Who has the time and inclination to single-handily bring down an entire on-line community??? It's sad that he's found it necessary to ruin something that many used to find helpful.

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  66. Your welcome, but I'm sure you will find another mutual admiration society.

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  67. "It's sad that he's found it necessary to ruin something that many used to find helpful."

    True. It's what trolls do.

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  68. You could always just skip over my posts if you really like the blog otherwise. There are still tons of people who participate. Well anyway, goodbye.

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