Monday, January 24, 2011

"The Talk," a CBS Daytime show, seeks parent to interview

Was your child rejected from a school lottery? If so, we want to hear from you ASAP!

"The Talk," a CBS Daytime show, is preparing a special program on education this week. We would need for you to be in-studio in Los Angeles on Thursday, January 27th. Since this is just days away, please send us in a brief description your story. In addition, we will need your full name, full address, daytime and evening contact numbers, email address and age. We also require that you send a RECENT photo of you and your child/family... as far as travel expense, we may be able to cover, we would need to speak with you first.

I look forward to hearing from you and hope that we can tell your important story on television.

Please email responses to ike.jablon@cbs.com

26 comments:

  1. I would imagine that daytime TV is looking for simple stories of joy and heartbreak, with public lotteries as shown in "Waiting for Superman." SFUSD's lottery is highly complex, many families wind up reasonably content in schools they didn't even originally apply for, and there's no public scene in which families are left in tears or jumping for joy.

    Here's an interesting commentary on those performance-art charter school lotteries.

    http://neatoday.org/2011/01/20/exploitative-charter-school-lotteries-not-required-by-law/

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  2. "Waiting for Superman" lost all touch with reality when it used the lottery for that family trying to avoid Woodside High School. What is the per capita income in Woodside? Their public high school is not good enough? Only the charter school is good enough? Parents always want the best for their children. Even if the charter school was better for that child, that does not make the Woodside High non-chartered high school second rate or worse.

    Sirloin steak is not filet mignon, but sirloin steak is still pretty good. And it is not McDonald's.

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  3. Good Lord there are thousands of people that were left out of the SFUSD school lottery. How will they choose. . .

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  4. No one is SF is "rejected" from the lottery - everyone is given a school, it is a choice to take it or not.

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  5. In past years there have been hundreds (not thousands) who didn't get one of their choices in the lottery--I think that is as good a marker as any for "left out," even if it is true that families get offered "something." Not to minimize the pain of these hundreds, by the way, just striving for accuracy--"thousands" is a huge exaggeration. Many of these hundreds ultimately did get an acceptable (to them) public spot, either through subsequent rounds or waitpools or through finding they liked their offered choice. Certainly many did not either, or moved on to other options before the process played out (and I'm not criticizing them either--surely we can agree that one of the problems with the old system was the uncertainty of it all).

    We don't know what the "left out" rate will be with the new system. That will certainly be interesting to see.

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  6. "Surely we can agree that one of the problems with the old system was the uncertainty of it all"

    But that's inherent with any school choice system - given the limited capacity of each individual school, you may not be able to accommodate all students who want to go a particular school. So you have to have some form of either selection or lottery. If you have no choice, then there's complete certainty - you get whatever the district decides is your neighborhood school. Personally, I'd rather have choice.

    The privates face the same issue - I'm sure there's parishoners each year in St. Brendan's who get steamed when after X years of contributing to the parish they get waitlisted, given St. Brendan's gets 80 parishoners applying for 20-odd open slots.

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  7. I brought in my application to SFUSD HQ but am having second thoughts and want to change it. As long as I do so before February 18th, can I go back in and change my choices? If so, how do I do it?

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  8. Anybody have any word on where Gateway Middle school's campus is likely to be? It is our top choice and I've been trying to figure out which SFUSD buildings might have extra space so that SFUSD might give that space to Gateway. Looks to me like there are two possibilities: the 7th Avenue and Lawton building that was formerly where Newcomer High was; and (possibly) the DeAvila campus -- as there's a Chinese Immersion program there that probably won't fill up the building. Anyone else have ideas as to where Gateway may end up?

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  9. What is happening with Newcomer High?

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  10. SFUSD's website says it was closed -- at least at that campus. Or is SFUSD's website wrong?

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  11. Word is that Gateway wants space at John Muir and John Muir doesn't want Gateway there.

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  12. 6:50 -- interesting. Thanks. I'm a little surprised that gateway would want to be at muir, and a little surprised that muir would not want gateway there. Having gateway at muir will turn off some middle class parents (muir has some serious issues). I would think muir would love to get some role models for the kids, and the gateway kids are going to have to be better models than they'd otherwise get.

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  13. Charters often battle with public schools over space, and when charter schools move into public schools, it often causes significant disruption and inconvenience.

    So it's really not surprising that the existing public school would have concerns.

    I have to question the notion that Gateway kids would be superior role models, though I certainly know wonderful kids at Gateway High School. I think Gateway itself would object to the implication that it plans to enroll a higher class of kids than the John Muir students. That entire notion is offensive -- and, not to mince words, racist.

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  14. geez caroline - give it a break. In reading that comment, there seems nothing racist about it. Gateway has the an incredible diverse population and a student population that predominately attends college after graduation. They would indeed be good role models for any school.

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  15. 9:26 am -- I agree. Caroline, by the way, is not a fan of charter schools (although I think her focus is on "chain" charters, not so much on one-off operations like Gateway), so I think that explains the uncalled-for comment.

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  16. Over 80% of Muir's students get free or reduced lunch. So an influx of kids who were not low SES would help.

    She pounces on any excuse to bash charters.

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  17. Why doesn't SFUSD move KIPP out of the building they share with Gateway High School and move Gateway Middle School into the same building with Gateway's High School?

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  18. 9:56 am -- the Gateway folks told me that KIPP is very happy where they are (in Gateway High's building) so that's why that wasn't done. Since KIPP has the space, I think KIPP would have to agree to move. So that's why that's not happening. Gateway was also looking for space close to its High school location, just to make things logistically easier for them. And that's why, I surmize (unless this anonymous person is wrong), they are focusing on Muir as a possibility. It is a relatively close to the High school building. It just seems to me that there may be other empty or not full locations nearby -- I was wondering about DeAvila, since the bldg there is huge (I don't think the Cantonese immersion program will fill up that bldg but maybe I'm wrong) or the 7th and Judah building that used to house Newcomer which I believe is empty. But as another poster noted, it is up to SFUSD to make the "first offer" to Gateway. And it may be that SFUSD has its reasons for not wanting Gateway in those locations.

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  19. FACT:

    Every year, there have been *at least* several thousand families that do not get *any* of seven picks for a school.

    Many have been assigned to schools that the Federal Government has targeted to shut down.

    Not a choice.

    The reason that we never get the real story about the number of families that are bumped is that the Teachers Union is terrified that voters will catch on that their taxes are going toward paying for schools for the children of illegals, while many children of multigeneration taxpayers can't get access to a reasonable school.

    That is gradually getting out. The result is that voters, the ones with taxable incomes, care less and less about the public school system.

    This year won't be any different.

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  20. ***FACT:

    Every year, there have been *at least* several thousand families that do not get *any* of seven picks for a school.*****

    So, there are about 4500 K students enrolled in SFUSD. Are you saying "several thousand" of them did not get any of their 7 picks?

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  21. 8:17 AM:

    You know the gig as well as I do.

    Yes, *every year*.

    Which means that the cumulative number of families who have not been about to get access to an acceptable schools likely exceeds 20,000. (That's counting from the time that the diversity index was implemented. Of course, the open door policy of the city toward illegals has made access much worse over the last five to ten years.)

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  22. According to a link on SFUSD's website (see below), there were 897 children who made a first round K pick but who did not enroll in Fall 20008. That INCLUDES children who received a listed choice, including their FIRST choice. Add in the kids who participated in the 6th and 9th grade lotteries, and you get 1, 1820 students who did not end up enrolling after participating in the lottery. Again, that INCLUDES kids who in fact DID receive one of their 8 choices.

    http://portal.sfusd.edu/data/epc/Did%20Not%20Enroll_Round%201%20First%20Choice%20Requests%20and%20Zip%20of%20Residence.pdf

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  23. I was not disparaging Gateway students at all -- I agree that it's a successful school community> I was questioning the implication that the John Muir community should be pleased (or grateful) to have a second school plunked onto its site because the students are good role models.

    It's incredibly disruptive to have a second school forced onto your site. When Balboa was faced with such a proposal a few years ago (which it successfully protested, it was going to require some teachers to give up their classrooms and float from room to room with their teaching materials on carts, for example.

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  24. Caroline-- I think the problem is you called someone a racist simply because they thought that gateway kids would be positive role models for the muir kids. Given that gateway kids are generally college bound, that's got to be some type of a positive for the muir kids. No one disagrees that there may be disruption, but we don't like it when the racist card is thrown out inappropriately.

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  25. Just noting that 10:11, who posted the comment to which I was responding, certainly did not indicate any awareness that there would be disruption. 10:11 predicted that the John Muir community would "love" the notion.

    My opinion is my opinion. Sorry to offend.

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  26. Of course it would be disruptive, but if you have a school that is terribly unenrolled, the options are to close the school down or share the space with other schools. Which is more disruptive? Total closure or sharing the space?

    Gateway is a PUBLIC SCHOOL too.
    It is a PUBLIC Charter.

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