Friday, August 20, 2010

Rachel Norton: Oh, so many questions!

This from Board of Education member Rachel Norton's blog:

I really do need to get a good night’s sleep tonight, but I’m trying to answer all the questions I’m getting and sort out for myself what issues really need addressing by the staff and which are just issues that are bound to arise because some people feel they “won” while others feel they “lost” when they saw the attendance area maps and feeder patterns. Here’s my working list of questions I am filing away to ask the staff at my next opportunity:

  • Language programs and pathways – lots of questions here about why some pathways are separated and others are merged — why wouldn’t it make sense, for example, to have both of the Japanese language/culture pathways (one at Clarendon and one at Rosa Parks) go together to the same middle school? Why did we feed the two very small Mandarin pathways (Starr King and Jose Ortega) into two separate middle schools rather than bringing them together?
  • Child development programs – the explanatory materials for parents need more explanation of our Child Development Programs, how to apply and a map of where they are located.
  • Middle school capacities vs. likely enrollment year one: the McKinley parents have complained that it looks like too few schools are feeding into Everett Middle School, but that seems to be the case for most of the middle schools. See this comment thread for more info.
Read the full post

57 comments:

  1. Why do you have all the low performing schools feed into Roosevelt, and your school and other Richmond schools all feed into Presidio? It isn't fair.

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  2. New Traditions is not a low scoring school. It's API is 807.

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  3. NT is tiny, 17 kids/grade.

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  4. I wonder how Roosevelt's current school community feels about the new feeder pattern.

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  5. It seems like it would make sense for Peabody to feed into Roosevelt. It's only 6 blocks away.

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  6. Bummer for King, Vis Valley, Mann and Everett. Once again the district gioves the shaft to east side schools.

    I doubt there will parents from Presidio, Giannini and Aptos up in arms.

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  7. Dear "It isn't fair",

    I guess your getting the picture.

    First of all, take into consideration that these zones provide a preference only after the other preferences. Which means that even if you are in the zone, particularly if it is a desirable school, there is absolutely no guarantee you will get in anyway. There is a high likelihood that you won't get in. And then what? The next closest school? Not bloody likely! - possibly the same problem and I don't see any preference built into the SAS to accommodate students that did not get their neighborhood (zone)school. I cannot stress this point enough.

    But those zones ought to make more sense in certain cases. I really don't have a background in the foreign language offerings that influenced the make up of zones, but that aside, it is a real bummer for some of those that live right next to a great school like Roosevelt but can't get it. It really illustrates the idea that if neighborhood placement was what the BOE had in mind, they have failed on that count in some areas.

    But let's remember that this is still a proposal and not finalized.

    But of course they didn't. That was just the way the administration hyped this plan to the press and the public.

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  8. My last paragraph above doesn't make sense in the context of what came before. That text was dangling below. What I wanted to say was that this SAS is not a neighborhood system because of the preferences.

    There are trying to split the baby. I believe it is an unworkable compromise. But we will have to see what happens next spring. Stay tuned. It could get ugly.

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  9. As I read it, there is some preference given to those families who are crowded out of their assignment area school. They come before the general population in the lottery.

    Anyway, I think we should see how it plays out, but I doubt the schools in the outer Richmond and Sunset will be crowded out (that includes Don's school). Too far to travel for families outside that area, and families within those areas will have their own good neighborhood schools. And the NW has huge capacity compared to numbers of kids who live there anyway--especially compared to the SE.

    Grattan is the school most likely to be pressured, I think, as it borders on several CTIP1 zones with middle class families.

    Anyway--the problems being articulated by most people here are not the same as those that Don is worried about. Lots of families don't like that their houses didn't end up in a school area that they like (elementary or middle feeder). This is a hazard of neighborhood schools, which Don seem wants to have even more--guaranteed placement, reduce or eliminate CTIP1, etc, and little possibility for movement if you don't like your school. Because that is the only way to have guaranteed placement--constrain movement of families if they don't like their assigned school. It works great if you love your assigned school, and not so great if you don't.

    I think the overall policy is worth trying as a balanced approach before trashing it. It's a step to neighborhood placement, with some flexibility that recongnizes the inequities involved in neighborhood boundaries. Can't we test drive this one?

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  10. New Traditions has 17 5th graders, but 30 1st and 50 kinder. But it's still small. If it were "perfectly" filled, there'd be 30 kids in every class, which is still tiny compared to Clarendon or Rooftop with 66 or 88 kids per grade.

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  11. "Grattan is the school most likely to be pressured, I think, as it borders on several CTIP1 zones with middle class families. "

    Huh? No CTIP1 zones border Grattan, unless you consider the Western Addition as bordering Grattan.

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  12. Well, if not exactly bordering, it is just not so far from the Western Addition or the John Muir area to get to Grattan. Certainly, compared to applying to Feinstein, Sunset, Alamo. So middle class families looking to get out of John Muir will be looking up the hill just a bit. Hopefully also to the city wide schools.

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  13. I just don't see how you can say this:

    "I doubt the schools in the outer Richmond and Sunset will be crowded out (that includes Don's school)."

    Schools like Presidio have far more applications than spots. That is just a fact. And state law provides that anyone can apply to any school. So the demand is not going to dry up.

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  14. Don, I think the comment was directed at elementary schools, not middle schools.

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  15. Horace Mann is being assigned four schools with very low test scores, a huge achievement gap, and historically poor parent involvement. There will be little socioeconomic diversity and most kids will be ELL Spanish. This seems like a school that is being screwed over, I don't get it. How does the assignment of kids from Webster, Starr King, Chavez and Buena Vista create equity and less "underserved" kids in one place? How will language pathway objectives be met for the tiny percentage of kids learning Mandarin? Why wasn't Moscone placed here--too high scoring and diverse?? How would you be feeling if your child was going to Horace Mann? If the plan is to send four schools here with significant challenges and huge achievement gaps the district should be prepared to provide more resources and interventions there also.

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  16. "Schools like Presidio have far more applications than spots."

    Well, they do now, under the current system that is about to be superceded. I know that when we went through the middle school process we put Presidio 4th on our list. It was really too far for us and would have been a long MUNI commute by 2 buses for our kid, or an impossible car ride before work. But not knowing if we would get our top choices, we wanted to put as many acceptable choices as possible. Fortunately, we got the top pick after all.

    Now that entering middle schoolers will be given an assignment up front from the feeder schools, fewer parents will need to apply to Presidio. There are plenty of spots at Presidio to accommodate the feeder schools--the issue will be those who may want to apply beyond the feeders. But I'm sure many families will be glad to default to Giannini, Hoover, etc. and those who are assigned to King are pretty unlikely to make the trek to Presidio.

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  17. It looks as though middle school feeder draft was proposed to keep the white middle class and chinese happy; thus, they will be retained in the district, boosting test scores and enrollment. These families, especially the whites, are the first to flee to the suburbs or go private. The chinese go to millbrae, burlingame miltpitas or cupertino. Other populations tend to be at a disadvantage socio-economically and are much less able to go private or move to a better school enviroment. They're pretty much stuck. What's going to happen when some or many of the lower performing middle schools get closed for repeated poor performance or have their principals and staff replaced as per one the "reach for the top" funding stipulations. Some of the "token" feeders are almost funny. Malcom X at Hoover? Imagine all of the negetive scrutiny those students will get. Archie Bunker himself could't have planned the current middle school feeders better. Now quit the clowning around sfusd and present a fair/diverse draft that doesn't seem like a caste system and : instead, one that supports all sfusd students. Diversity really does work. It helps to understand and accept others including one's self. It's not an all or nothing, winner or looser type of enviroment. It also encourages other to strive. It may not look as pretty on the surface but at the end of the day I feel it is much more healthier.

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  18. I think how this will play out is all panicked speculation at this point. People hate change. They hated the old system, and begged for more certainty. Now that they've been given more certainty, they hate that too. There's been a huge amount of progress in this district in the last 10 to 15 years and there are now a lot of good schools. Having lived through two previous enrollment systems, I can say there is no perfect enrollment system. I am sure some tweaks will be necessary with this one, but as we head into middle school with child number 3 I'm willing to give this system the chance to work. (assigned to different middle school than older kids.)

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  19. Someone said -Diversity really does work. It helps to understand and accept others including one's self. It's not an all or nothing, winner or looser type of enviroment. It also encourages other to strive. It may not look as pretty on the surface but at the end of the day I feel it is much more healthier.

    If this were true why does SFUSD have such low test scores in the AA and Hispanic populations?

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  20. There still may be an achievement gap but lack of diversity in most schools hastens it. Lower performing schools, inexperienced teachers, less resources are often found in the mostly Hispanic and AA schools.

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  21. 8:11 are you assigned to Mann? are you willing to "give this a chance" on one of the really underperforming schools or is it a situation where your older kids went to Giannini and you are "willing to give a chance" to say Aptos? big difference in many of these schools and many saying give it a chance will not be in the Vis Valley, Mann, etc. schools.

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  22. The below is a link to a survey the district has put out to gather feedback, you might want to complete:

    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/VC7TQGX

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  23. 8:11 here. I would not dismiss Horace Mann out of hand. I would give it a chance by going to look at it, talking to the principal (Mark Sanchez BTW), talking with the teachers, and finding out what the plans are for the school. A good principal and dedicated teachers can make or break a struggling school. I wouldn't sign my child up for any school without looking at it though. Even the "best" school isn't right for every child.

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  24. "Some of the "token" feeders are almost funny. Malcom X at Hoover?"

    I attended Hoover in the mid-'80s, and this is pretty much what happened back then. If you lived in the Sunset, you were guaranteed an assignment to the school, which was considered to be one of the top public middle schools in the city back then (not unlike today). But if you lived in an area in Hunter's Point, this was also your default assignment, and a school bus transported the kids from HP to Hoover every day. What's old is new again, I guess.

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  25. I'd prefer fewer, larger All Spanish-immersion middle schools rather than a bunch of smaller "tracks" within schools.

    You'd have the critical mass and economies of scale to assure a well-stocked bilingual library, bilingual administrators and counselors, and possibly even some interesting extras (Spanish-language student literary magazine? Theater program? Chorus?)

    You might even be able to create a *real* GATE/Honors program for Spanish-speaking kids unwilling to give up Spanish. (Right now, GATE-ID'd kids have to give up Spanish-immersion, and, therefore, Spanish, if they need more challenging academics. That's a big reason many middle class families give up on immersion even though all the research indicates to get the full benefit, you need to continue through middle school.)

    BEst of all, there'd be more Spanish-immersion teachers on a single campus, making it easier for them to collaborate in developing and improving curriculum.

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  26. LOVE that idea... Bet you could get corporate funding for theater program, etc given emphasis on growing Hispanic population (in a way that you couldn't in a GE school).

    It would be so great on so many levels for all kids.

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  27. 11:47, actually research shows you need more than two classes per day at the middle level to continue to benefit from immersion. An all immersion middle school would allow that to happen. What SFUSD offers now is watered down immersion at the middle school level which is another reason people don't continue since the immersion benefits do not for some families offset the other things families want and need at that age.

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  28. 11:47: I wholeheartedly second your opinion. The district needs to finish what they start in terms of having a Spanish/Chinese immersion middle school. It is my understanding that the kids need to complete eight years of study in a foreign language in order to maintain fluency at a more advanced level. Otherwise, it would truly be a waste of time and efforts. Rachel, could you please look into this?

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  29. What SFUSD offers now is watered down immersion at the middle school level which is another reason people don't continue since the immersion benefits do not for some families offset the other things families want and need at that age.

    It's a little more tricky than that. Currently in the actual immersion programs at the middle school level (not the bilingual programs which are not the same thing), there are two core academic classes offered in the target language. Each kid gets five core classes with immersion--one more than the kids in honors, btw--social studies, two language arts classes, one for each language, then math and science. So, 2/5 in the target language.

    The tricky thing is that half the kids are going the other way. They have a huge, huge need to become more proficient in English! So offering all-day classes in say, Spanish, would be a problem. I agree that adding an elective or two in Spanish--you mentioned theater--would be great. But we need to keep at least half the classes in English. It is dual immersion for a reason, because it is serving many ELL students. That is why the model moves from almost all Spanish at kinder to half-half by 5th grade to 2 core classes by 6-8th.

    Another kind of set-up, one that is serving mostly already English-proficient kids, could go closer to all-immersion at that level. We have to consider the needs of the ELL kids--and they really are English language learners, not proficient many of them.

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  30. a silver lining for Eastsiders?August 22, 2010 at 11:09 PM

    I'm wondering if one of the intents of the new policy was that now that Westsiders will be sending their kids to their high-ranking neighborhood schools this will leave most/all of the slots in the citiwide schools for the Eastsiders.

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  31. @11:09

    Hmmm...interesting theory but I can't figure the East Siders have much to cheer about.
    I foresee many west side residents applying for citywide language immersion schools and strands and still shutting out the East Side residents who helped found them in their own neighborhoods.

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  32. West side residents make out like bandits. They have preferred access to most of their own high-performing schools, and equal access to high-performing immersion schools and immersion tracks on the east side. Their own schools also feed into higher-performing middle schools.

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  33. it was not at all just eastside residents who helped found the immersion programs on the eastside. There are many westside residents who helped with the first few years at eastside schools that people on the eastside didn't want to go to. I know of several families at Flynn, Marshall and Monroe like that for sure. These programs were attended by people from Noe, Inner Sunset, outer Sunset and Richmond, Inner Richmond as well as Mission, Bernal and Potrero. There were also families from Ingleside. Please do not state as fact that "East Side residents who helped found them in their own neighborhoods" when you are probably not someone who had a child in the first few years of any of these programs.

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  34. Right on 9:42, I'm tired of this East side / West side debate. Plenty of people from the Sunset have been schleping it across town for immersion for years. You don't hear them complaining that there are no language programs on the West side of town.

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  35. Hey! There are no language programs on the West side of town! Unfair!

    (Is that better? :)

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  36. I have never understood why they don't convert the Cantonese bilingual program at McCoppin into an immersion program. The bilingual program is vastly under-requested, especially when you consider the school's ideal location and start time. We have so much demand for Cantonese immersion in our district, and the native speakers are already at there.

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  37. I suspect those that are saying "I'm tired of this east/west side debate" are those in good school assignment who are desperate for this PRELIMINARY map to finalize. We have a month to discuss this suggested configuration, so bring on all the complaints about your perception of inequality of the division! That is what we are supposed to be doing during this time that the board has asked for feedback.

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  38. When people refer to east side or west side in this debate it most likely has to do with people in the schools on those sides of the city - not necessarily where they live - particularly when you are talking about current students. In the future it will be different.

    Do you really think people will still be trying to get into the immersion programs on the east side of the city if they know they will be funneled into a low performing middle school?

    We are in an immersion program right now that we love, but I don't know if I would have made the same decision now if I had an incoming Kindergartner next year.

    I guess it depends on what the other options are. If your attendance area school isn't that great and feeds in to another low performing middle school would you move to another part of town and forget immersion or still try for immersion knowing it feeds into a low performing middle school? I don't know.

    But for people whose attendance elementary is pretty good and feeds into a decent middle school, it seems most will not try for immersion on the east side of town.

    Depending on how you look at it, maybe it is good for English speaking families on the east side of town because they will have less competition to get into the spanish language programs now. But if you're on the east side of town and not interested in immersion then you don't have many options.

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  39. 2:02, I agree. Please voice your concerns now.

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  40. 2:13, you have a point. West side kids that get into a good neighborhood GE program in their 'hood aren't going to be trying for the immersion spots on the East side of town. At least not as many as in years past. This will help the East side kids have more access to language programs. So really the East side kids win b/c they will have more access to language programs that are near their homes. It's the West side kids that will miss out on the immersion experience. And they have to live in the fog. So there. East side wins!

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  41. 2:45
    Well I couldn't tell if you were joking. But I definitely don't think east side wins in this. I was just looking for a silver lining. And trying guess how it will play out.

    Setting aside my personal situation, I think the new system is terribly unfair. On the whole, it benefits the privileged at the expense of the underserved. Sure, there are going to be exceptions to this rule. But not enough.

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  42. Well, good, you said it then. It's not "East Side/West Side," it's "privileged/underprivileged." This system actually benefits me, and I think it's unfair.

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  43. Dear Sf Kfile readers,

    I would hope that at least some of the readers on this blog would realize that there is at least one or more people that write in using my name and say things that are intended to make me look foolish.

    I cannot speak for the mental health of this person or persons, but I will say that if you read something with my name on it there is no way to tell whether it was actually written by me. It is unfortunate that someone ruins the integrity of this blog because of some personal vendetta.

    I have tried to ignore this kind of nonsense, but since at least some people are gullible enough to buy into it, I do have to make this known to those that don't understand it. It is really amazing how nasty some people can get by engaging in this behavior.

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  44. It's not privelged/unprivileged. The truly underserved live in the CTIP 1 areas and are rightfully being given a leg up in the system. The folks that are upset seem to be the middle class folks who live on the east side - outside of a CTIP 1 area - and want to send their kids across town for school. I get that it sucks if your neighborhood school isn't up to your standards. I'd be bummed too. But eliminating bus service saves a lot of money - money we need in the classroom. And, for me, it's important to have my kids in schools in close promiximity to home and to eachother. My kids will soon be in more than one school and I can't spend all morning shuffling my kids around. I need to be able to put at least the older one on a safe, relatively short muni ride. The middle school feeder system meets this needs for many people.

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  45. - Some comments on the new student assignment system.


    Regarding winners and losers, we have three separate SASs so each must be evaluated individually. I’m not going to go into a long analysis in the age of tweets, but I’ll try to sum up from the neighborhood perspective.

    1. Elementary school - The number of seats available to neighbors after preferences could and likely will leave many non CDC zone residents out in the cold. We will have to see what actually happens with CTIP1 usage, but one sure but separate outcome will be that certain CDCs will become impacted due to the assurance of placement in a desirable K. If you add up the numbers, siblings and CDC together could easily garner most of the spots. After a few years most out of zone siblings would attrit, with CTIP1 excepted. But all CTIP1 students that can navigate the travel issues get in anyway by that time. The result – no win for large numbers of neighborhood residents in zones sought after schools.

    2. Middle school – Neighborhood schools, not students, win and only to the extent that neighborhood students get into elementary neighborhood schools do the middle school neighbors win. But as I said above, there is little assurance of that.


    Note - SFUSD would not have written in the CDC preference for low income zone residents only after siblings if they thought that neighbors would be getting in anyway. They put that in because THEY KNEW that many would NOT get in at sought after schools. So this was a way to make schools more SES diverse. That’s a good thing. But don’t call it a neighborhood schools policy if only certain demographics are assured entry.

    3. High school – total neighborhood loss with lottery for all schools without individual placement policies.

    Regarding my support for neighborhood schools –

    After all the analysis I believe that the BOE voted this in because SFUSD cannot continue to afford to lose high achieving students whose parents can afford, in some cases, to opt out of public. The District SAS policy which is family unfriendly and legally and politically driven has made millions for the privates and is their prime recruiting tool. (SFUSD was under court stewardship and is not entirely to blame.)

    On balance, this push to privates will not change much because there is little assurance for neighborhood advocates as even the seemingly pro middle school policy is entirely dependent on the anti neighborhood elementary policy. And with high school fundamentally unchanged from before many will continue to exit public at that stage or at middle if they managed to get an elementary placement to their liking.

    SFUSD has to deal with two kinds of drop outs. The ones at the low end of achievement that have failed as a result of numerous factors, and the ones at the high end who ‘drop out’ to attend private school. (By the way, this year zeros will be recorded for traditional dropouts for API purposes. This will cause declines in performance at already low performing schools, but will not affect the high performing ones.)

    Two final points

    1. Having to travel across town to go to school really sucks in so many ways and that is true for all people, except for those that want to do so.

    2. People of color in the SE want good neighborhood schools and don’t want SFUSD using diversity as a tool to help development interests. That said, s large number of vocal whites from the SE do want to maintain a system that allows them to escape low performing schools because they have the means to. Most of the residents there want the schools fixed and that is why there is much neighborhood schools support in BVHP.

    Fixing them is the rub. But if some union seniority protections can be modified and if the windfall SIG money is put to good use there is a better chance than ever before to make real reforms so we do not have to force people of all kinds to travel far to get a high quality education.

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  46. Some comments on the new student assignment system - We have three separate SASs so each must be evaluated individually. I’m not going to go into a long analysis in the age of tweets, but I’ll try to sum up from the perspective of neighborhood schools.

    1. Elementary school - The small number of seats that will be available after preferences could and likely will leave many non CDC zone residents without spots. If you add up the numbers siblings and CDC together could garner most of the spots. After a few years most out of area siblings with CTIP1 excepted would attrite. But then CTIP1 students get in anyway if they can navigate the travel issues. We will have to see what actually happens with CTIP1 usage, but one outcome will be that certain CDCs will become impacted due to the assurance of placement in K. The result – no win for large numbers of neighborhood residents in sought after schools.

    Note - SFUSD would not have written in the CDC preference for low income zone residents only after siblings if they thought that neighbors would be getting in anyway. They put that in because THEY KNEW that many would NOT get in at sought after schools. So this was a way t o make schools more SES diverse. That’s a good thing. But don’t call it a neighborhood schools policy if only certain demographics get guaranteed entry.

    2. Middle school – Neighborhood students do not win. Neighborhood schools win and to the extent that neighborhood students get into neighborhood schools they win. But as I said above, there is little assurance of that.


    3. High school – total neighborhood loss with lottery for all schools without individual placement policies.


    After all the analysis I believe the BOE/SFUSD realized that they cannot afford to continue to lose high achieving students whose parents can afford in some cases to opt out of public and create diversity. SFUSD has made millions for the privates as their past SASs are their prime recruiting tool. On balance, this will not change with this SAS because there is little assurance for neighborhood placement as even the seemingly pro middle school policy is entirely dependent on the anti neighborhood elementary policy as it plays out in sought after schools. And high school is largely unchanged.

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  47. The BOE has to raise achievement and is data driven.

    To do that they have to deal with two kinds of drop outs - the ones at the low end of achievement that have failed as a result of numerous factors, and the ones at the high end who ‘drop out’ to attend private school. The former is the harder one. In the case of the latter middle class parents can be retained through SAS policy and achievement can be raised.

    (By the way, this year zeros will be recorded for traditional dropouts for API purposes. This will cause declines in performance at already low performing schools, but will not affect the high performing ones.) This will further pressure districts so they must find ways to keep high performing students. Unfortunately I don’t think this will work on balance.


    Having to travel across town to go to school has perpetuated attrition from PS. People in the SE like everywhere else want good neighborhood schools and don’t want SFUSD using diversity as a tool to help development interests in the sense that SFUSD can and did close or downsize schools which were considered blight to aid developers who want to raise the profile and bring in middle class buyers.

    That said, I understand why a large number of vocal whites from the SE want to maintain a system that allows them to escape low performing schools because they have the means and will to. But most of the residents there want the schools fixed and that is why there is much neighborhood schools support in BVHP.

    Of course fixing them is the rub. But if some union seniority protections can continue to be modified as they are beginning to be, and if the windfall SIG money is put to good use there is a better chance than ever before to make real reforms so we do not have to force people of all kinds to travel far to get a high quality education. This has largely resulted in discontent with little or no relative achievement gains to show for it in the main.

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  48. more lies from Don:

    "there is much neighborhood schools support in BVHP"

    Completely untrue.

    70 percent of public school families in Bayview-Hunters Point chose schools outside their neighborhood.

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  49. If you were right you wouldn't need to fight dirty.

    BVHP and the SE in general has the highest population of public school children and the lowest number of schools to accommodate them. And most of the schools in the area are small schools that are below capacity. This is a well understood problem for SFUSD in its efforts to move towards accepted standards of local attendance. It is not a matter of debate except for the uninformed.

    Students in PI schools have the right to attend outside schools before the rest of the population that request schools outside the attendance area.

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  50. 70 percent of public school families in Bayview-Hunters Point chose schools outside their neighborhood.

    So how much support can there be for "neighborhood schools"?

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  51. It's how they do the polls.

    They ask "do you want high quality schools in your neighborhood?"

    And the answer from everyone, is, of course :YES.

    If you asked again: "Would you send your child to a school in this neighborhood?"
    And 70% of the people answer : "NO

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  52. People from BVHP go outside neighborhood but typically don't go very far. There's not a huge movement of kids from there to the NE or NW schools.

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  53. Rachel @8:45

    Here's what you wrote at 8:45-

    70 percent of public school families in Bayview-Hunters Point chose schools outside their neighborhood.

    Here's what you wrote in your blog

    70 percent of public school families in Bayview-Hunters Point choose schools outside their neighborhood, and what this proposal would do is instead give them strong incentives to stay closer to home (and remove the current incentive the choice system gives them to leave). The influx of new, more empowered and aware parents will almost certainly lift achievement at the schools in the Bayview, but only after the first class or two of “pioneers” is forced by lack of other choices to enroll. Again, does that seem fair? Any fairer than forcing families to leave their neighborhoods through a busing-based policy? End post

    It is pretty hard not choose school outside your neighborhood when there are not enough seats to accommodate children in their neighborhood. You are painting a skewed picture to make a point. Turning around schools is the name of the game. Did you write the post about diversity trumping achievement?

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  54. Busted! Nice one.

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  55. Don, take your meds.

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  56. The emperor has no socks.

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  57. Why not post as yourself if you are going to repeat what you say on your blog?

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