Monday, August 9, 2010

Latest wait pool numbers from SFUSD

Wait pool numbers as of August 6:

http://portal.sfusd.edu/data/epc/WP_Cohorts%20FOR%20WEB%20%208_6_10.pdf

71 comments:

  1. I've done a very unscientific compare b/w the June 30 and Aug 6 waitpools. Most waitpools are down. A few schools have larger waitpools, but I think this is mostly from Late additions. The big movers were:

    Lilienthal GE -21
    Alvarado SE -14
    Rooftop -13
    Both Clarendons -11
    Fong Yu -11
    Grattan -11
    Miraloma -11
    Sherman -10
    Argonne -9
    Buena Vista SE -8

    This is the overall waitpool number. I didn't look w/in the cohorts.

    Someone already commented, that Grattan now has only 13 total, less than Sunnyside with 16. ER Taylor has 26 total in it's GE program, the same as Rooftop! These numbers really are all over the place, but overall down, which is good news for those of us still waiting!

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  2. A quick look through the waitpool list shows that there are quite a few good schools with very small or no wait lists. (This is not to imply that there aren't other very good schools in this category--I just happened to notice these.)

    Flynn GE: 4
    Moscone: 3
    Monroe GE: 4
    Redding: 0
    SF Community: 3
    Spring Valley: 0

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  3. Can we still change our waitpool? I thought we were locked in after this last deadline?

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  4. I just answered my own question on the EPC site. "Final changes to WP 2010 - August 13, 2010" So we can change until this Friday, the day b/f school starts. EPC also says "We do not anticipate any further waiting pool runs until right before school commences again on August 16th." So I wonder if they will be doing runs all week? If anybody gets a letter, please post here!

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  5. BTW, I believe that if a school has no wait pool and there is an opening, it is available immediately through open enrollment. If you have no school, you could enroll and still stay on the wait list for another school.

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  6. I love this list... having watched this process for three years now (preK year, K year and now 1st).. this is the most informative one ever. Is every school listed?

    The numbers are very interesting, I hope people who are waiting will get good news soon. I expect a lot of movement in the early week due to people leaving the city.

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  7. duh.. i just realized why there was such movement on the waitlists.. the re-activation. People who didn't re-activate were dropped.

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  8. You know, I just really want to get into our neighborhood school this year. I do not want to have to follow this whole process again next year. And I especially don't want to have to educate myself on the new system, keep up with the deadlines, etc, etc. I sure hope we get some good news next week!

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  9. I just spoke to someone at EPC and she said there are no more lottery runs until after the 3 day count. She also discouraged me from staying in immersion school waitpool as she said there is rarely any movement. Depressing but probably true!

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  10. Can someone explain to me what it means by the LATE column on the wp list? Thx. (Does it mean that a person never entered the lottery at the beginning; didn't meet certain deadlines; never listed the chosen school; etc.?)

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  11. Late, just means they turned in their application sometime after that January deadline. They are bottom of the barrel in the waitpools.

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  12. Question re: "I just spoke to someone at EPC and she said there are no more lottery runs until after the 3 day count." Was it your understanding that they won't make any assignement and call people until Thursday, Aug. 19? My understanding was that the schools would start calling people on Aug. 16 if they didn't show up. If the reached someone that said they were not coming to school, then EPC would go ahead and start giving those spots away. I was thinking the calls would start going out as early as Tuesday, Aug. 17. Thoughts?

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  13. FYI - for people who didn't get into spanish immersion, Edison Charter has a 50/50% english /spanish K this year. Not sure if there are still openings, but that's what were doing if we don't get the immersion school across the street from us.

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  14. How Flynn can be considered a good school by anyone is evidence of how going thru the SFUSD process can completely warp one's judgement. That school is bottom of the barrel. Let's keep perspective, folks!

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  15. just got letter of acceptance to Grattan... any advice? Take it or move?? Please help never visited Grattan? Help, Thanks.

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  16. where is everybody?
    is anyone seeing movement or what?

    how do we read this waitpool list? does the list mean 10 are waiting to get into Sherman or Sherman moved around and opened up 10 slots in August 6th waitpool?
    thanks.

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  17. Oh puleeze. Yes, please let's do keep perspective and not throw little bombs like this into the conversation. Generalized trashing ("bottom of the barrel) is so boring. But if you have specific criticisms backed up by facts, that's great; we can all use information and a good discussion. Remember, we may have different perspectives and emphases when it comes to picking a school.

    Flynn is a very diverse school with a hard-working community of teachers and parents. In the future it will likely continue to draw from a mix of Mission and Bernal families. I know several families who are deeply engaged there and quite happy. For those who can tolerate mixed family backgrounds in terms of social class and status, it's a fine draw, especially with immersion now and IB in the future. Beautiful facility too, and bordering on a park. Plus C.Chavez Street will be looking beautiful in 2 years or so.

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  18. "just got letter of acceptance to Grattan... any advice? Take it or move?? Please help never visited Grattan? Help, Thanks."

    Is this a serious question? Take the spot! Grattan is a great school. You are very lucky!

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  19. how do we read this waitpool list? does the list mean 10 are waiting to get into Sherman or Sherman moved around and opened up 10 slots in August 6th waitpool?
    thanks.


    The list means that as of August 6, X number were still in the waitpool for that school. Depending on how many kids either dis-enroll or don't show up in the first 3 days of school, some of those families may get a call.

    Also, priority will be given to the various pool segments, reading from left to right. So the left-most pool will be drawn from first.

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  20. However, within one category , priority is not given on a first come first serve basis. In other words you can be the only one on the list , then suddenly there is number two, then when there is a opening , the number 2 may get the spot because they run another lottery within one group on the wp. Our friend's kid "almost" got into one desirable school only to lose to a second family, who happens to be wealthy enough to get into any private school but chose to go public.

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  21. New Traditions also only has 3 on the waitpool, all low priority. Near USF and the Panhandle, if you were looking at Lilienthal, Grattan or Clarendon (or even Chinese Immersion at DeAvila, if you're willing to drop immersion).

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  22. No, 9:45pm. I think the question from 9:29pm is asking about the first post on this thread with the "unscientific compare."

    This person lists several schools like "Sherman - 10" and it does not mean 10 are still in the waitpool overall! It means the previous WP run had 30, and there is now a total of 20 waiting.

    The "unscientific compare" list at top of this thread is telling you the difference in total waiting from this waitpool run and the previous one, or how many may have moved off the waitpool for whatever reason. So Lilienthal GE moved 21 people off the waitlist for whatever reason (example: placed at the school, didn't reassign, moved to another waitpool, etc).

    9:45pm gives a good explanation of how to read the waitpool chart posted by sfusd.

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  23. Who got a letter from Grattan and has never visited? I just don't get that at all. Is it a joke. You chose Grattan as the one 'pie in the sky' school to waitpool for the whole Spring and Summer, you finally get in, in August (ahead of 13 other families who are still waiting to get in) and you've never been and don't know if you should take it? You must have secured a really nice private school spot. I can't imagine what is up with this.

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  24. Wow, where did this come from?

    Maybe this person is just clueless and has other things to do than spend a year touring and genuflecting to try to get into a middle of the road San Francisco school. Fancy that that he or she just stumbled onto an opening.

    I'm sorry, but I really don't see any rational basis to equate this person's slightly misinformed question with those supposedly nefarious "private school" parents.

    It's representative of the underlying antipathy that exists in the SF public school system toward middle class families.

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  25. "representative of the underlying antipathy" my arse. it's jealousy. there are 13 other families that have been stressing aobut this all spring and summer. the only way someone isn't "genuflecting" is b/c they have some other option for K. They must be enrolled at a private school. And good luck to them. It's nice to have choices. Many don't.

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  26. The waitpool for English-speakers to get into Daniel Webster's immersion program is bigger than the one for West Portal's immersion program.

    That's some progress by DW.

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  27. "underlying antipathy that exists in the SF public school system toward middle class families."

    What a wonderful example of the confusion in this country about what it means to be middle class. Middle-income families (median income, somewhere in the $75,000 range) cannot afford private school in this town. Maybe they can afford some of the parochial schools, but most middle class families are not thinking about private school. Nor are the families, about half of SFUSD, who qualify as poor.

    Upper-middle class families, especially white upper-middle class families, are the ones who look at private schools in this city and maybe public. It's not slamming them to say that. It's just a sociological observation. Upper class people of course only look at private schools.

    Then some of the upper-middles agonize about the choices if they get one, because they see the bells and whistles, and their friends from various social circles are there, but if they get into a decent public, like Grattan, they sort of know it makes more financial sense to take it, because even on an upper-middle class salary it is expensive to live in this city (which is why so many private schools give some financial aid up to $200,000 family income--defined by the Obama Admin as the borderline of "rich"--because it is the top 3% of income earners in the country). It is a peculiarity of this class to agonize over these choices that others don't have or (in the case of the rich) wouldn't consider in the first place.

    Anyway, I didn't read the comment about the person likely holding a private spot as antipathy. Nor do I feel antipathy, just for the record. I read it as a plausible commentary on how someone could possibly have gotten a call off a deep waitpool list and not have clue about the school. People with no other options would not know about their waitpool school. People with options can afford to be oblivious--and that is okay if they can afford to be! It *is* funny though, and I think we real middle class families do get to wonder at it a little bit.

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  28. The lottery system has caused a great deal of anger, jealousy, stress,and negativity in a lot of us. We all want the best for our kids and there are only a few trophy schools with limited spaces. But parents, the bottome line is parent involvement in the kids' education. Not a lot of public schools, now matter how resourceful they are, are going to produce students who read and do maths above grade levels. With a diverse student body, some in the middle, some at both ends of the spectrum, there's no way a teacher can properly educate the best and brightest while trying to fulfill the basic requirements for those who are still lagging behind. Further, all schools share the same curriculum as directed by the school district, don't they? My point is to channel your frustration into something positive: Do it yourself. We have a child who is entering first grade in a not so desirable school and we have no expectations whatsoever that the public system will help him advance at or beyond his level. We also are not fortunate enough to have a choice to go private. But we are fortunate enough to afford one parent to stay home. (I realize this is rare; I used to work as a lawyer myself in a two income family.) After some reflection, we have decided to help him at home: A form of homeschooling after school hours to teach him beyond his grade level. He basically goes to school to socialize; we will take care of the academics/extra curricular activities at home. Truly sad about the state of public education, since other parents may not have the opportunity to stay home to educate their child themselves.

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  29. Did the Grattan person list the school for waitpool or is the acceptance some kind of EPC mistake? I find it hard to believe someone doesn't know anything about a school and yet continued to list it everytime plus verify the waitpool choice with the EPC over the summer?

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  30. I agree. I think it's a joke.

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  31. Duh. Yeah, in this city, middle class runs up through 200K if you have one kid and $240k if you have two.

    Not our fault. That's just the cost of living in this town.

    As I was submitting my application last fall, I was surprised at the number of parents (mostly white) who seemed clueless as to the difficulty of getting into a middle of the road school in this town. They did not seem like they were in the 200K+ crowd.

    Some people are just not interested in this whole process. I'd imagine that their strategy is to do a reasonable job with the application and then move if it doesn't work out. Or maybe they can wait for another year.

    So, again, your antipathy toward this person's question is ridiculous. You don't know what their situation is.

    I've even spoken to several parents who were happy they got Harvey Milk over Grattan. It's not unreasonable to ask about Grattan.

    It's just a question.

    And I will say that I'm sick of the vicious class and race identity politics in this city. The presumptions and ignorance is alarming.

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  32. The secretary at my daughters' Spanish Immersion elementary school indicated that there would be no movement before the "10 day" run, which I took to mean that they won't give spots away right away. She made it seem that it would be some time after the first day of school that any spots would be offered. She was not yet in possession of the wait list.

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  33. Flynn is getting an excellent new Principal in Karling Aguilera-Forte. He previously was principal at Fairmount for 5 years before doing a two year stint in the Superintendent's Office. Great news for Flynn families.

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  34. "Yeah, in this city, middle class runs up through 200K if you have one kid and $240k if you have two."

    No. That may be your perspective based on your social group and who you hang with, but yes, even granted that San Francisco is a high-cost city, with correspondingly higher salaries than the rest of the U.S., your statement is objectively out of whack with reality.

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau (American Community Survey 3-year data set through 2008):

    Total households earning between $150,000 and $200,000 = 8.8%.

    Total households earning above $200,000 = 12.2%.

    That means about 80% of us earn less than someone who makes $150,000. If you are above $150,000, you are in the top quintile for income in the wealthy city of San Francisco. If you are above $200,000 then, you are in the top 12.2%. I'm sure the percentile is even smaller for your hypothetical household making $240,000, but the charts stop at $200K.

    The percentiles are a little wider for "families" as opposed to households (accounting for 2-income earners, mostly), but not much.

    Here's the link:
    http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ADPTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=05000US06075&-qr_name=ACS_2008_3YR_G00_DP3YR3&-context=adp&-ds_name=&-tree_id=3308&-_lang=en&-redoLog=false&-format=

    Families in the top quintile are not middle class. It's a quirk of American self-identification that we like to think of ourselves as middle class. But the numbers tell a different tale. Anyone in the top quintile, who is not frankly out-and-out rich (making over $250,000 in San Francisco let's say), is UPPER-MIDDLE class. That is a different set of interests and quirks than the middle class. I'm not saying it's bad, honest, just pointing out that these conversations are easier to digest if one is aware that one's situation (regarding, let's say, public education) as an upper-middle class person is not the same as that of a middle class person making $70,000 for his/her family. And it's helpful to know that those who make above $200,000 are a small minority, even in this city of inflated numbers.

    For an interesting start on thinking about this term "middle class," try this link.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_middle_class

    I know, it's only a wikipedia site, but it's not a bad discussion and it is reasonably well sourced.

    Try this too, through the Wall Street Journal, no less. The "rich-o-meter" link is kinda fun:

    http://blogs.wsj.com/wealth/2007/02/01/the-rich-o-meter/

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  35. 2:12

    I'm not interested in splitting hairs about the term "middle class."

    The reason that we are having this discussion has nothing to do with the middle class.

    We are having this discussion because San Francisco and California have not acted pragmatically in their economic decisions. As a result, most of our schools are of poor quality.

    Which is why you see all these people scrambling to get into Grattan.

    You may have a fixation with who describes themself as middle class. However, that will not result in improvement of our schools.

    In fact, this attitude is likely to lead to the flight of the professional middle class from public schools, from the city and from California.

    And, by the way, your income analysis does not include pensions, so it is largely meaningless.

    I won't be responding to you further. I trust that you will be putting up more statistics to support your agenda of antipathy toward professional income earners.

    To the person who was asking about Grattan, I'd tour the school. If you are reasonably comfortable with what you see, take the spot. But do think about what you are going to do about middle school and beyond.

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  36. 2:29, run away from the facts if you want, but the term "middle class" is definitely an issue when the district (and posters here) are regularly accused of "antipathy" toward the middle class of San Francisco. Especially in the context of constant whining about how this or that hard-working school community is never good enough.

    SFUSD has its problems, no doubt, but in many ways it is looking out for the interests of the vast majority of families in San Francisco. One might suggest that it would be in the district's interests to attend more to the needs of "professional middle class" families as you put it--aka the upper-middle class. That's a fine debate to have. But let's have it out in the open and not pretend that the interests of this group and the rest are exactly the same. They are overlapping in many, many ways, and I would suggest that we all try to find common ground, but it is helpful, I think, to know where one stands to survey the landscape. That is my main point.

    By the way, your comment about pensions is way off-topic. Most families today in any income group don't have defined benefit pensions. Those few that do can mainly count on about $25,000 year in today's dollars--not nothin', but not huge amounts either. Most upper-middle class families are educated enough to have some reasonable amount socked away in 401(k) plans (or they should). By contrast, many middle income families can't afford to put away too much, if any, which is why the loss of pensions will bite us all in the butt years hence. So in fact, upper-middle families are in general way ahead on retirement too. But it's really kind of an irrelevant question to the topic at hand. The fact that pensions are being used as a political football in debates today is duly noted though.

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  37. Daniel Webster has a line of committed Potrero Hill parents who want their kids in an up-and-coming neighborhood school. Bravo to them!

    And Flynn was my favorite of all the schools I toured. If test scores are your thing, don't go immersion. In fact, consider leaving California altogether. Otherwise, Flynn has a great deal going for it and I'd kill for a space in their Spanish immersion program.

    About pensions, whatever. I technically have a pension plan but I am certain it will be savaged by right-wingers and I'll be eating cat food as an old lady, like all the other educators in this anti-intellectual scandal of a state. It's a red herring -- the stock market crashes, so let's force all the people left in the country into individually managed 401Ks sucked from their paychecks, since it worked out so fabulously for the rich the last time we did it in the 1980s! And people are falling for it, as if state workers constitute some kind of elite, as opposed to the real elite who are walking away with absolutely everything. It makes me sick. We teachers try not to take it out on your children, but if they're taught by the lowest of the low and the dumbest of the dumb by the end of this decade, it's because the crazed campaign against decent benefits drove the rest of us out of the profession.

    Rant over. Go DW and Flynn!

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  38. "just got letter of acceptance to Grattan... any advice? Take it or move?? Please help never visited Grattan? Help, Thanks."

    really? we've are on the waiting list to get into Grattan, and you got it and don't know if you want it? i'm so frustrated right now. a lot of people received acceptance letter last week, and once again we were shafted.

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  39. thanks for all the advice... we changed waitpools because ours seemed like such a longshot and put Grattan because it is close to home but I never had a chance to tour many schools and school starts next week-needed the input. i also had not heard as much about it, we will be happy there I am certain, I just didn't know much about it...I am relieved and happy. my child is asian and i noticed on great schools it has a small number of asian youth...

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  40. Grattan is a great school. Fantastic teachers, principal and staff, and a committed parent group. I'm not sure what you are looking for in a school, but I imagine you and your child will be happy at Grattan. Good luck with your decision.

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  41. I didn't tour any schools. I just chose the ones with decent scores that were located close to our home. I only listed four and got my first choice. It was our neighborhood school. I think it's common to just pick the way I did.

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  42. Um, 11:36, good for you, but it's not common among people on this list. A lot of people worked their tails off, followed all the rules, listed 7, and strategized, and still got nothing. The least you can do is offer a bit of sympathy instead of a shrug.

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  43. 11:36, I too listed the schools closest to my house and put first the GE program three blocks away. We looked at a map and filled in the 7 blanks with the closest schools. Some we toured some we didn't. We got our 7th choice. It's decent but far away. We've been on the waitlist all summer for the school three blocks away and are not holding out much hope. There are 13 people on the waitlist and we are in the lower 1/7 cohort. It's all luck.

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  44. Grattan is having a parent (no kids due to construction) work day this coming Saturday 8/14 9:00 to 1:00. You can meet some of the parents and probably get a feel for the school. I accepted Grattan based primarily on my impression of the community from the kindergarten get together prior to school (I was at the time wait listing another school).

    You are correct, the Asian community is small, but I have heard of no issues from the Asian parents about this once they are there (I am going into my 6th year there).

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  45. Also a Kindergarten orientation at Grattan this Friday (8/13) 2-3 PM to meet the principal, the K teachers and other parents.

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  46. We were very fortunate and just got into our wait pool school on Saturday, August 7. We were 0/14. I am a former elementary school teacher and currently develop elementary school curriculum for a nonprofit organization. I've written a blog post about our experience here:
    http://devstu.org/blogs/2010/08/10/the-parents-the-pdf-and-the-official-letter

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  47. Lisa Borah Geller

    Congrats - What school?

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  48. Just got back into town and back on the grid and saw that there is now one student in the waiting pool for 2nd grade at New Traditions. I have faxed both SFUSD and the school office to relinquish our spot. My fax machine says both transmissions went through. Hope your family will get a call soon.

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  49. I am happy but slightly jealous that there are some families out there getting their official letters. I just wished that my daughter had an assignment before the first day so she could experience all the excitement!

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  50. Just heard we got a spot at Miraloma, we just may take it!

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  51. To Aug 11 5:02,

    Congratulations! I'm happy for you, but I agree with the previous poster (anxious and sad that we're still waiting).

    Out of curiosity, did you get a later August 6...or was it a phone call? Does it mean you are automatically registered, or do you have to accept?

    Thanks.

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  52. To Aug 11 5:02,

    Congratulations! I'm happy for you, but I agree with the other previous poster (anxious and sad that we're still waiting).

    Out of curiosity, did you get a letter August 7...or was it a phone call more recent? Does it mean you are automatically registered, or do you have to accept?

    Thanks.

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  53. We are amongst the 0/14, with the school starting on the 16th, we are anxious to know the outcome of the last lottery. Just wondering if the family who received the letter from SFUSD assigning them Miraloma got it after the 6th Aug or later. I am checking my email and the mail box, nothing till now.

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  54. still in a daze from the excitement but finally getting around to posting to the community here. middle class/asian family that had been 0/14 and been waiting to get into CIS through the whole process but at the last waitpool change, finally caved in and gave up dream of immersion for my daughter. Changed WP choice to our neighborhood school (which has decent test scores and faculty seem very good). Wasn't holding out hope that when school started, we would be placed there. Waited overnight at open enrollment at EPC and got Sheridan (which by the way, if you ignore the physical neighborhood, I believe it's an up and coming school - new facilities and probably the best auditorium at the elementary level). Got a physical letter in the mailbox this past Saturday saying that we had received our waitpool choice. Registered on Monday and went to new students orientation on Wednesday. Not sure if our spot at Sheridan had been allocated yet...if not, you may want to give it a try if the location of the school (SF/Daly City border) is along your route to work. Best wishes to those still looking.

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  55. 2:38 -- that's good news -- congratulations!

    Also wanted to say I agree that Sheridan is a fine option to look at for 0/15 families. Even if you wanted to try again next year for immersion or a more local school to you, it would be a good option for kindergarten. It is a lovely school with a warm principal, active PTA, a small but growing # of middle class families, and as mentioned, an art program, and a nice facility with creatively designed classrooms and an actual auditorium. Test scores are higher than several trophies despite more "at risk" demographics. It's a happy, functional community. Your kid really could have a good kinder year there.

    Check out Rachel Norton's blog post about her visit to Sheridan last spring (with photos):

    http://rachelnorton.com/2010/03/27/a-visit-to-sheridan-elementary/

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  56. just heard from a co-worker today that they got a call and got their waitlist school alamo

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  57. Reminder - today is the last day to change your waitpool. I imagine most people are pretty set on the waitpool they are in at this point. But if you want to make any last minute changes, you have until 5pm today. After that, no more changes in the next two weeks. Then the waitpools are dissolved. Good luck!

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  58. I've calculated that based on the number of people on the waitpool and the number of kids in the school that in order for us to for sure get a call 17% of the kids would have to be no shows. For us to even have a chance (we are in a lower waitpool cohort) 11% of the kids would have to be no shows. Does this seem at all possible? Seems to me that 17% of the kids not showing up is a far stretch.

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  59. 17% is not a stretch (well, maybe for Rooftop & Clarendon). Last year we got into a Alvarado GE via waitpool on the first Friday. Out of the 22 kids in the class, at least EIGHT that I saw came in from the waitpool after school started. Unbelievable but true.

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  60. 11:25, that is great news. We're just waiting for our neighborhood GE program. There are 66 kids so maybe 11 won't show, or will get a call for their waitpool. And maybe some of the people ahead of us in the waitpool will get the call but choose just to stay wherever they have started school (i hear this happens sometimes). I have renwed hope. THX!

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  61. Has anyone seen an update to the WP list post Aug 6?

    I heard today that Grattan's cohort 1 group increased from 7 to 8. I'm surprised that someone would change their waitpool choice to Grattan at this late stage.

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  62. I don't think EPC will be posting anymore updates to the waitpools. They are talking about it on the first thread that the info is going to be changing so much in the next two weeks that it would be stale by the time it was posted.

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  63. I was the new addition to the Grattan 0/7 waitpool. But someone I know got in by phone yesterday, so it should be back to 7 or lower (if more got in). I know it seems nuts to switch on the last day, but the odds were better than our other waitpool. We also figured there might be more movement since Grattan might have more people switching to privates if spots open up. But, frankly, so far everything about this whole process defies logic and analysis so we just decided to put down our favorite school which was Grattan.

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  64. 323pm, thanks for the info. Crazy that a spot opened up there yesterday. Clearly the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing do there as the 8 count was confirmed again for me yesterday evening by a staffer. If they don't have a centralized software program to track and monitor this info, it makes me wonder how "hightech" is their "lottery" program placing kids?!?!?

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  65. There is NO WAY there isn't a person involved in choosing many of these spots. Case in point: I heard every kid at the UCSF Mission Bay preschool got into Sunnyside, even if they listed it far down the list (while many who listed it first did not get it). Coincidence that principal at the time was from UCSF? Maybe there is some initial computer use, but I think someone is definitely reviewing zip code, preschool, who is known to the city. As many have pointed out, those who work for the city often don't have issues either. Until there is transparency, you can't count on anything. There are no rules. I am confident someone will get a hold of the data someday, visualize it, and reveal what a corrupt system we have.

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  66. 5:17 pm

    I also think that a person is working through the lists, not a computer.

    Of course, it would be very difficult to prove this.

    And every person who get's a school they want instantly becomes a poster child for how wonderful the system is, while those who don't either move, quietly accept a poor school until they move, or go private/parochial. The private/parochial group is vilified and the movers have moved, so in the past, there haven't been enough parents willing and able to question the fairness or corruptness of the application process.

    This year, with the three day count down, there will be almost no time to work through the waitpools. Then the waitpools will be vaporized. We'll never know how many parents have been left in limbo.

    I think the EPC should be forced to account for the school assignment of every family that is still waitlisting.

    Unfortunately, they have no intension of doing this.

    The waitlist will be vaporized. It will be another years where 500+ families will be "assigned" to a school that apparently even the federal government finds unacceptable. Even with "assignments" to these "1-1" schools, there may not be enough school slots available. Of course, the EPC won't be held accountable for this, as they will have vaporized the waitlists.

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  67. "I heard every kid at the UCSF Mission Bay preschool got into Sunnyside, even if they listed it far down the list (while many who listed it first did not get it)."

    For the record-
    1) There were about 20 kids at UCSF Mission Bay that are going off to kindergarten. I think about 5-6 are going to Sunnyside. So it's a gross exaggeration to say every kid is going there.

    2) If a school has more applicants than seats it doesn't matter who put "school X" in which of the 7 slots. You are thrown in the pool with everyone who listed that school as one of their 7 choices. The rank only matters in the unlikely event you match at 2 schools. You will be assigned the school you ranked highest. THis is a common and persistent misunderstanding of this current assignment system.

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  68. If it helps you to think that there is a computer involved at this stage in the game... then fine... believe. The EPC says that no waitlist "runs" are happening, but people are getting called. Spots are available and people at EPC are picking people to call. Do you think they are using a computer to figure out who to call on the Grattan waitlist? I don't think so.

    If you were watching this board in prior years, you would have heard stories, at this point in time, of EPC counselors telling people that if they switched their waitpool choice to x, they would give them a spot on the spot (but technically not spots available in the school for open enrollment)

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  69. "I also think that a person is working through the lists, not a computer.

    Of course, it would be very difficult to prove this.

    And every person who get's a school they want instantly becomes a poster child for how wonderful the system is, while those who don't either move, quietly accept a poor school until they move, or go private/parochial. The private/parochial group is vilified and the movers have moved, so in the past, there haven't been enough parents willing and able to question the fairness or corruptness of the application process."

    If the assignment process data was available, I think it would be quite easy to demonstrate that the current system is nothing more than thinly disguised version of bussing. Of course getting access to that data w/o a lawsuit forcing the sfusd to provide it is unlikely.

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  70. "2) If a school has more applicants than seats it doesn't matter who put "school X" in which of the 7 slots. You are thrown in the pool with everyone who listed that school as one of their 7 choices. The rank only matters in the unlikely event you match at 2 schools. You will be assigned the school you ranked highest. THis is a common and persistent misunderstanding of this current assignment system."

    If this is a common misunderstanding, it is because staff at the epc have consistently indicated that the slot ranking does make a difference. That may indeed be incorrect as you describe, but the epc has been reinforcing it.

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  71. 3:42, you are correct. 8/14 10:04, you have the common misperception. Even PPS, has stated that "the algorithm uses what rank you put a school as a tie-breaker between candidates with the same diversity index." Rank is not just used if you get into more than one school, like most people think.

    If you don't get your first choice school, then your chances of getting your second choice school are much much lower because you're automatically behind anyone who listed that school as a first choice school. And if you don't get that one, you're way out of luck for the third choice, etc. Loosing the lottery for your first choice school can have a cascading effect of shutting you out of all of your choices.

    You can see this clearly described in Stage F of page 5 of the technical description. After attendance area, parent preference rank breaks ties, then random choice.

    But at this point EPC does not care. It's like beating a dead horse. We are the last year of K parents to get screwed by this crazy lotto. Good luck everyone! I hope you all get your waitpool.

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