Friday, May 14, 2010

Wanted: Stories about cheating in high school

Hi: I'm working on a story about high school students cheating. A small study just came out from Science Daily reporting that most high school students cheat. For example, 74 percent said they provided answers to someone else during a test. I'd love to hear anecdotes from parents of high school students and I'd especially like to hear from teachers who can speak to how cheating has changed in high school over the years. You can email me at thesfkfiles@gmail.com. Thanks!

17 comments:

  1. I know at some high schools, during tests, all the electronics are turned off (iPods, Phones, etc.) placed in the backpacks and put in the front of the classroom

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  2. Cheating has been a problem for eons. I remember even in my days that people would hold up their paper as if to study it closely. It was to afford the person behind them a look at the answers. Not a lot of passing papers, that was too obvious.

    Also whispering was out too as being too risky. But I remember hand signals and sign language being used and sometimes even tapping on chairs. Question 1 was 1 tap, etc. for multiple choice and reciprocal taps for the answers.

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  3. I wouldn't mind if the kids learning a useful (or at least interesting) skill during cheating, like morse code or sign language. ;-)

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  4. I think it is important to define exactly what is considered cheating. Copying someone else's work is cheating, but I was surprised to hear from middle and high school teachers that they considered students helping each other with homework (not letting another student copy your homework, but just helping them understand the subject matter, or guiding them through a tough math problem) was also considered cheating.

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  5. Well what about cheating in elementary school when the teacher whispers the answer to students while pretending to pat them on the back and encourage them...with another adult proctor in the room?
    And what about an Associate Superintendent for Equity, Kevin Truitt, refusing to acknowledge that it happened after the testing office is called in and 4 of 8 students interviewed admit that they were told or shown answers? And the icing on the cake ladies and gents is the Board of Ed members and Superintendent that ignored it as well,swept in UNDER the rug, because it might get some African American families in the Western Addition upset because the school was threatened with closure.
    Solution?
    Move the Principal, label her as a liar, ruin her career.

    But these children go to middle school and high school and what do you suppose they see wrong with cheating on tests and lying about it? If they do, they've learned the hidden curriculum in SFUSD.

    But wait until the Civil Rights Law suit happens for harassment of a full inclusion student at the same wonderful site. Also ignored by the same cast of characters.

    This is our world class school system.

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  6. but I do 1 and 1 is 2May 14, 2010 at 8:07 PM

    When Google is your handmaiden, Wikipedia is your BFF, and slide rules have given way to iPhone apps via calculators, the time is ripe for a redefinition of the rules of information gathering and retrieval. This is not your mother's row of desks.

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  7. Pat,
    The teacher, the principal, and even Truitt end up looking good when the scores pf AA kids at Cobb rise. Are you really surprised that they would all like to hush up the reason for the rise in scores (teacher-assisted cheating)?

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  8. Good point. What I am ashamed of is the neglect of full inclusion students by the BOE and Truitt when it comes to harassment and the site not following the IEP.
    I have copies of my requests for assistance from 555. Same employee- a bully of adults and children- is shielded to promote Truitt's and Maufas' careers as Western Addition heroes.

    The irony? The bullied SPED children are African American and low income.

    Oh I sure am glad we have an Office of Equity.

    And the beat goes on.

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  9. All of a sudden Ms. Forte cares about the inclusion students she completely ignored for years?

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  10. That's right. And unless you're willing to use your real name, sockpuppet, you have nothing to add.

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  11. Whatever ya say, Penobscot52.
    Or Helen.

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  12. sniff sniff
    smells like a Board of Ed rat who blogs but won't print anything that disagrees with her public image and poses as an advocate for sped

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  13. Nope, I'm not on the BOE. You seem really unbalanced and should get help. And please stay away from children.

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  14. The thread is supposed to be about cheating in High School, not about disgruntled ex-principals. Can you guys just ignore her please? She is trying to take over every thread on this blog with her grudges.

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  15. Is this person an example of how SFUSD can't get rid of the few bad apples?

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  16. Yes, a classic example. Scary, isn't it?

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  17. Great topic! Yes, cheating is ubiquitous in the schools. I should know, I've been teaching for 14 years. It ranges from copying hw to plagiarism to cheating on exams. Often kids treat it as normal and, if we look at society as a whole, it is. CEOs and Wall Street bankers cheat. Bernie Madoff cheated. Military contractors cheat. George Bush cheated. To really stamp it out in school is difficult, particular with all the wonderful role models out their flaunting it proudly. It is also very difficult unless administrators will back teachers who enforce strict integrity policies. This is difficult because parents often challenge integrity accusations and administrators aren't always willing to fight an irate parent.

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